Why Values and a Purpose are Vital for Leaders Today

purpose

Matthew Snider is a writer, a personal development junkie and a regular blogger at Self Development Secrets, a blog to help you achieve your goals. For more tips like these, I encourage you to visit his site.

Have you worked under someone who was so assured and stood their ground that no matter what happened, he or she knew what mattered? Then you’ve probably worked with a leader who has strong, unshakeable values. It’s not about the money, recognition or power. These values that drive them are something bigger. Finding your purpose is one thing. Finding it as a leader is an entirely different subject. It’s not about emulating other successful leaders or key figures in the industry; it’s about identifying your real values in life, knowing that this gives you a definite purpose for making the tough decisions as a leader. Let’s go about finding out how these things can be so vital to being a better leader.

 

The Making Of A Better Leader

Making decisions is what leaders do. They get paid to make the tough calls. But what’s more important are the values of a leader. It gives the team consistency and stability. What I mean by that is this: having a set of values will give a team a direction, a company culture, and adds some meaning to the work that is being done. All these start from the top, the leader, and flows down to every level. Now every leader has their values, and they can differ from one to another. Two good leaders can have completely different values. So what exactly is a value and how does it help one become a better leader?

 

“Great people have great values and great ethics.” -Jeffrey Gitomer

 

What Are Values?

Values are what is important to us—in other words, what we value, or the thing that drives us. People will have certain core values which help shape them into who they are today. The same values can also be different for everyone. For example, if two people value love, they can show it in very different ways through their actions or vocally. It’s sad to think that even though we all have values, when it comes to working, we tend to adopt the values we were taught to follow. Unfortunately, these values can hurt us, and it’s not something we would like to associate with our real values.

 

The Purpose Of A Leader

Harvard Business Review states that based on the author’s understanding, less than 20% of leaders have a strong sense of individual purpose. These same leaders can tell us the mission statement of the company, but they lack the sole purpose that makes them stand out as a leader. It doesn’t matter if you’re the CEO of a multi-million-dollar company or told to lead a small team of three, your purpose is what makes you, you. It’s your why: why you’re working, why you want to lead the team and more. That’s the difference between leaders, and a good leader has an ultimate purpose. This is why some leaders get remembered and acknowledged long after they’re gone.

 

How to Find Your Purpose?

Lead True by Putting People First

Leadership Compass

Put People, Organization and Community First

No matter the industry, leaders face the same types of challenges. It’s a leader’s personal compass that makes all the difference.

Jeff Thompson, MD is chief executive officer emeritus at Gundersen Health System. He’s a pediatrician, an author, and a speaker on building a mission-driven culture. During his tenure, Gundersen Health was recognized for its quality care. Dr. Thompson was awarded the White House Champions of Change award in 2013.

I recently spoke to him about his new book on leadership, Lead True: Live Your Values, Build Your People, Inspire Your Community.

 

Leadership Tip: Show people you are there to build them, not rule them.

 

Give Others Courage

You share the dramatic story of you intubating a baby, risking your own career to save a life. There are so many leadership lessons in this story. But I want to ask this: how do you teach others to make these decisions?

No leader can always be everywhere. No rule book can cover every situation. To prepare the staff first you need to believe you are there to build them, not rule them. Holding people accountable is looking backwards…being responsible for their success is looking forward. Give them the tools to make these decisions without you. You need to set a pattern of clarity of the values of the organization, the priority of service above hierarchy, service above self, long-term good over short-term self-protection. When they see you live this, when they see you recognize this in others and support this level of behavior, they will have the courage to do the same.

 

“You want to invite new ideas, not new rules.” –Dan Heath

 

Courage and discipline. You linked these together. Tell us why and how they relate.

Aristotle is attributed to have said, “Courage is the first of human virtues because it makes all others possible.”  Courage isn’t the absence of fear, it just means fear doesn’t get to make the choice. Having courage is a great start….without courage so little will move forward. But discipline gives courage legs. It focuses and moves the work forward. It keeps you from letting your courage make a stand but accomplish little.

For example…those protesting pipelines and coal burning are very courageous…but if they also have the discipline to lead the conservation effort…they will force the market pressures to limit new pipelines and coal burning. Courage plus discipline will have a much greater effect.

Or you may have bold clear no compromise rules in your organization about how all staff will be treated or how gender and diversity will be respected. Clear, courageous but not effective unless you have the discipline to live by it when one of your high performing stars behaves badly. You need the discipline to follow up on your bold stance. No one’s ego can be more important than the well-being of the staff or organization.

 

“Good leaders don’t tell people what to do, they give teams capability and inspiration.” –Jeffrey Immelt

 

Be a Humble Leader

How Leveraging the Network Can Help Your Business Grow

How to Survive & Grow in the Digital Age

 

How do you create value today?

What’s the best way to scale an enterprise?

How do you grow a company faster than ever and scale with lower cost?

 

It’s all possible if you leverage the network.

 

That’s how companies like Amazon, Airbnb, and Uber have succeeded against the odds.

 

“Entrepreneurial business favors the open mind.” –Richard Branson

 

In The Network Imperative: How to Survive and Grow in the Age of Digital Business Models , authors Barry Libert, Megan Beck and Jerry Wind argue that it is the way companies create value. And today, the best way to create value is through scalable and digitally networked business models – like Amazon, Google, Uber, Airbnb – that leverage networks of employees, customers, and suppliers.

 

Create a Virtual Network

For those not yet familiar with your work, what’s the network imperative?

The network imperative is recognizing that today’s most valuable companies are virtual networks that rely on digital platforms. This leading edge, new business model is emerging in every industry: Amazon and Alibaba in the retail industry, Match.com and Tinder in dating, Facebook and Instagram in Social Media, LinkedIn in professional resumes, Airbnb and Homeaway in room rentals, Uber and Lyft in shared car services, as well as the NYSE and NASDAQ in the financial sector.

 

What did your research show in terms of the financial results of “network orchestrators” versus the other 3 business models?

These business models – which we call Network Orchestrators – are more about orchestrating resources, be it insights, relationships, cars, homes, and skills rather than owning them. In addition, they scale based on the a flywheel effect , e.g. the more people, services and interactions there are on the network, the more others will join and make available their assets – whether that’s friends, photos, resumes, cars or homes.

 

“What’s dangerous is not to evolve.” –Jeff Bezos

 

5 Steps to Become Network Centric

Would you briefly describe the PIVOT model?

Our research indicates that all organizations have dormant, virtual networks of either employees, customers, prospects, suppliers, investors or alumni that, when combined with a digital platform and a clear incentive system to share what they have, what they know and who they know with others, can apply network orchestration to their business model. To help incumbents transition from firm centered (where they focus on what they make, market and sell) to network centric (where they orchestrate what others have and create peer-to-peer connections), we created a 5 step process called PIVOT.  The 5 steps are:

  1. Pinpoint your current business model (e.g. which of the 4 business models are you? Asset builder, service provider, technology creator or network orchestrator?)
  2. Inventory all your assets both tangible (e.g. plant, property and equipment as well as money) and intangible (brand, intellectual capital and relationships as well as interactions and big data).
  3. Visualize your future digital platform that connects your network of people or things.
  4. Operate your new digital network and virtual platform alongside your existing business and protect it while it grows, experimenting along the way to find the sweet spot that insures its success.
  5. Track using new big data metrics such as engagement, sentiment or interaction along with traditional financial measures to see how your network is doing and the value it creates.

 

“Show me your budget and I’ll tell you what you value.” –Joe Biden

Why To Value People Over Profit

Valuing People Over Profit

Dale Partridge is a serial entrepreneur, best known for founding Sevenly. Sevenly donates $7 of every purchase to charity. With over $25 million in sales, the company is known for giving to others. Dale’s story of Sevenly is covered in his new book, People Over Profit: Break the System, Live with Purpose, Be More Successful. In it, he also includes the story of his firing from the company he founded. Dale’s passion is about building sustainable businesses that also hold up the principles of honesty, transparency, and authenticity.

I recently had the opportunity to ask Dale about his experiences and how he upends common wisdom.

 

“When morality comes up against profit, it is seldom that profit loses.” -Shirley Chisholm

 

Everyone Deserves Respect and Kindness 

The concept “people over profit” sounds so simple, but most leaders struggle with it.  How do leaders make this a reality in their organizations?Dale Partridge (683x1024)

First off, let’s remember that the book isn’t called People Instead of Profit: the bottom line still matters. BUT, valuing People Over Profit is a top-down philosophy. It starts with leaders recognizing the intrinsic value of their fellow humans and that everyone deserves honesty, respect, care, kindness. Inside of that simple yet difficult discipline, we will find our companies becoming more profitable. The idea is that when people feel valued, they work harder, they work with more integrity, they work with more intentionality, and they work with more passion than ever before. On the flip side, when customers feel the same way, they share, they talk and they increase their loyalties.

 

“In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act.” -George Orwell

 

Tell us about Sevenly—the business model, the values, a little about the story behind it all.

It was ultimately a mission to raise awareness and funding for the world’s most important causes. While we only imagined we would make a small dent in a big issue, we never would’ve thought we’d end up raising over $4 million in $7 increments for these causes. Looking back, it was some of the greatest and most rewarding work I’ve ever done.

 

“Rather than love, than money, than fame, give me truth.” -Henry David Thoreau

 

Homesick for a World That Cares

For the first time in history, people are paying more to do business with companies that are following higher ethical standards and pursuing social goals.  What is behind this? 

We’re homesick for a world that cares. Consumers are searching for a more truthful existence. We want to believe the world is honest and cares and loves, and at the core we believe that by doing so we might understand it. The characteristics of integrity have reigned true and have won since the beginning of time. While they are simple, we still find ourselves as adults struggling with these virtues. Valuing people over profit as an economy is simply a better model, and people are finally beginning to realize that.

 

“Generosity must be built in, not packed on.” -Dale Partridge

 

What’s your definition of authenticity? Of transparency? 

Authenticity means not denying the cost of being who you are. We are who we are and we stand for what we stand for, but authenticity is when you don’t change in the face of a cost that challenges the very core of your identity.

Transparency is logic and emotion. Logically, it’s vulnerability plus acceptability equals transparency. Emotionally, it’s the courage to allow your heart to be fully seen by others.

POP_Cover_Gold_R1You cannot manufacture authenticity, a point you make in the book. Have any examples to share of companies making this mistake? 

Companies all around us are packing on generosity to their business models in hopes that consumers will believe they actually care. But authenticity requires history, and there is a price to be paid to prove that you care. At the core, we want to see companies whose leaders’ hearts are fully behind their beliefs, rather than just their marketability. Any one of the hundreds of retailers that ask you to round up to donate to charity at checkout typically fall into this category. It’s not a bad thing as long as the heart is authentically behind it. Unfortunately, in most cases, that’s not the case. Generosity must be built in, not packed on.

 

“Fear kills more dreams than failure ever will.” -Dale Partridge

 

Insane Courage

Would Your Client Write You a Check After Your Sales Presentation?

 

Would your prospect write a check for your sales call?

Read that title again.

What?

You’re thinking you want the sale.  You don’t expect to get a check for the call.  You’re lucky to have gotten the appointment.

Neil Rackham is the author of many books like Spin Selling, Rethinking the Sales Force and a number of other books.  Years ago, when I was a new sales executive, Neil spoke at one of our meetings.  After his presentation, he met with a small group of us.  Most of the discussion I’ve long forgotten, but I’ve never forgotten this question.

Bring Incredible Value

He asked:

“Is your sales call so valuable that your client would write a check for your visit?”

He obviously wasn’t suggesting we collect checks after every client meeting.  But he was saying that we should bring value to the call.  More value than a sales pitch.  We should do our homework and be able to offer solutions to the client beyond simply closing a deal.