How Women Entrepreneurs Can Think Bigger

female entrepreneur

Go All-In

 

Are you thinking big enough?

Do you have what it takes?

Are you ready to go ALL-IN?

 

Stephanie Breedlove is the Co-Founder of Care.com HomePay and author of All In: How Women Entrepreneurs Can Think Bigger, Build Sustainable Businesses, and Change the World.

I recently caught up with Stephanie to talk about the lessons she has learned from her experiences as an entrepreneur. These lessons and her advice apply to all entrepreneurs, but her new book includes specific advice for women.

 

Called to Entrepreneurship

How do you know if you’re called to be an entrepreneur?

In choosing entrepreneurship, you are required to take on risk, barriers, financial strain, and uncertainty in virtually every area of life – from the possibility of failure, to the unknown of the size of success if you make it, to what your career will look like as you navigate the journey. In a nutshell, it’s often bring-ya-to-your-knees work and is not sexy, contrary to what the media may lead you to believe. Yes, there is potential upside in entrepreneurship, but who would logically sign on for the guaranteed difficulties if not called?

So how do you know if you are called? One of the beauties of entrepreneurship is that there is no standard or template, so I think most of our callings are as unique as a fingerprint. However, I do believe we have a set of common ideals and a way of seeing the world that builds a foundation common to most entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurship is very hot and trendy today, but it is not a path that will be successful or enjoyable if it is not where your best talents live. I had a thriving corporate career prior to taking the leap into entrepreneurship, with the status and ego that accompany the corporate position. The leap into entrepreneurship was very humbling, yet I couldn’t have been more in my element and comfortable in my own skin – I knew it was where I belonged. Here’s my list to help you know if you are being called, or not.

 

How to Know if You Have the Call

You might be called to entrepreneurship if…

  1. You are going to a new endeavor, not running from your current situation.
  2. You have an idea that will create value.
  3. You have an idea that will grow and potentially create wealth.
  4. You believe your authentic way of working, building or delivering is ahead of its time and of greater value than what is currently available on the market.
  5. You feel being a Jack or Jill of All Trades is a valuable skill, and you enjoy tackling new responsibilities with which you have no experience.
  6. You think broadly and can sew all aspects of a business together to create overarching success.
  7. You have smart but blind optimism in the long-term potential of your idea – enough to thrive in the lean years.
  8. You are excited about working harder than you have ever worked, even if it means being without a paycheck (for a while).

You are not being called to entrepreneurship if…

Why To Value People Over Profit

Valuing People Over Profit

Dale Partridge is a serial entrepreneur, best known for founding Sevenly. Sevenly donates $7 of every purchase to charity. With over $25 million in sales, the company is known for giving to others. Dale’s story of Sevenly is covered in his new book, People Over Profit: Break the System, Live with Purpose, Be More Successful. In it, he also includes the story of his firing from the company he founded. Dale’s passion is about building sustainable businesses that also hold up the principles of honesty, transparency, and authenticity.

I recently had the opportunity to ask Dale about his experiences and how he upends common wisdom.

 

“When morality comes up against profit, it is seldom that profit loses.” -Shirley Chisholm

 

Everyone Deserves Respect and Kindness 

The concept “people over profit” sounds so simple, but most leaders struggle with it.  How do leaders make this a reality in their organizations?Dale Partridge (683x1024)

First off, let’s remember that the book isn’t called People Instead of Profit: the bottom line still matters. BUT, valuing People Over Profit is a top-down philosophy. It starts with leaders recognizing the intrinsic value of their fellow humans and that everyone deserves honesty, respect, care, kindness. Inside of that simple yet difficult discipline, we will find our companies becoming more profitable. The idea is that when people feel valued, they work harder, they work with more integrity, they work with more intentionality, and they work with more passion than ever before. On the flip side, when customers feel the same way, they share, they talk and they increase their loyalties.

 

“In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act.” -George Orwell

 

Tell us about Sevenly—the business model, the values, a little about the story behind it all.

It was ultimately a mission to raise awareness and funding for the world’s most important causes. While we only imagined we would make a small dent in a big issue, we never would’ve thought we’d end up raising over $4 million in $7 increments for these causes. Looking back, it was some of the greatest and most rewarding work I’ve ever done.

 

“Rather than love, than money, than fame, give me truth.” -Henry David Thoreau

 

Homesick for a World That Cares

For the first time in history, people are paying more to do business with companies that are following higher ethical standards and pursuing social goals.  What is behind this? 

We’re homesick for a world that cares. Consumers are searching for a more truthful existence. We want to believe the world is honest and cares and loves, and at the core we believe that by doing so we might understand it. The characteristics of integrity have reigned true and have won since the beginning of time. While they are simple, we still find ourselves as adults struggling with these virtues. Valuing people over profit as an economy is simply a better model, and people are finally beginning to realize that.

 

“Generosity must be built in, not packed on.” -Dale Partridge

 

What’s your definition of authenticity? Of transparency? 

Authenticity means not denying the cost of being who you are. We are who we are and we stand for what we stand for, but authenticity is when you don’t change in the face of a cost that challenges the very core of your identity.

Transparency is logic and emotion. Logically, it’s vulnerability plus acceptability equals transparency. Emotionally, it’s the courage to allow your heart to be fully seen by others.

POP_Cover_Gold_R1You cannot manufacture authenticity, a point you make in the book. Have any examples to share of companies making this mistake? 

Companies all around us are packing on generosity to their business models in hopes that consumers will believe they actually care. But authenticity requires history, and there is a price to be paid to prove that you care. At the core, we want to see companies whose leaders’ hearts are fully behind their beliefs, rather than just their marketability. Any one of the hundreds of retailers that ask you to round up to donate to charity at checkout typically fall into this category. It’s not a bad thing as long as the heart is authentically behind it. Unfortunately, in most cases, that’s not the case. Generosity must be built in, not packed on.

 

“Fear kills more dreams than failure ever will.” -Dale Partridge

 

Insane Courage