Is Your Company Ready for the Next Cyber Threat?

digital threat

Are You Prepared?

Security incidents are up 66% year-over-year since 2009. Despite this alarming statistic, 80% of CEOs report that they are confident in their company’s cybersecurity.

Cybercrime is on the rise.

Are you prepared? 

Cybersecurity expert Ray A. Rothrock shares the tactics used by hackers and then arms management with the tools to prevent these hacks in his new book Digital Resilience: Is Your Company Ready for the Next Cyber Threat?

 

76 percent of respondents to Cyberthreat Defense Report indicated that they were successfully compromised by a cyberattack.

 

Why Leaders Must Pay Attention

Ray, your book is compelling. It starts by scaring us beyond belief. For those who haven’t read your book yet, would you go ahead and scare our readers…

By the end of 2016, one category of cyberattack on business —ransomware infection– topped 4,000 instances per day. One publication, CSO, recently posted an estimate that cybercrime damage will hit $6 trillion by 2021 and, by 2022, the human attack surface, the potential victim pool, for cybercrime will reach 6 billion, which is 75 percent of the projected 2020 world population of 8 billion.

So, if you want to be scared, chew on the incontrovertible fact that you and your business are being attacked today, and you will be attacked tomorrow and the day after and the day after that. Obviously, you need excellent cybersecurity—firewalls, antivirus software, antimalware software, automatic downloading and installation of the latest security patches for all your software, and a workforce educated in basic digital hygiene. Yet the hard truth is that even the best cybersecurity will be penetrated. Some of those daily attacks will pierce your perimeter defenses.

Mediocre security will stop some attacks. Good security will stop more attacks. The best security will stop even more. But, whether mediocre or exceptional, all security will ultimately fail. You will be breached, and, if you depend on security alone, the effects of the next breach—the next inevitable breach—may be annoying or may put your business at great risk. This is why you need both excellent digital security and excellent digital resilience.  In short, you need to be prepared because you will be attacked.  Resilience starts with preparation.

 

“Resilience starts with preparation.” -Ray Rothrock

 

Shore Up Your Resilience

9 Leadership Lessons from Dad

This post is in honor of Father’s Day. Father’s Day is this Sunday, June 19th.

Wisdom from Dad

How old I was, I don’t know. Probably around four or five years old, give or take, though my father will likely correct the number with his own memory of the same event. It was a typical hot summer day, and my family was enjoying a day at the beach. We were in Ocean City, New Jersey, to be specific. At that time, the beach seemed to stretch on forever, which I now realize was a function of my age more than the actual distance of the sand. We brought food to the beach, which was typical because there was no way my father would pay Boardwalk prices for anything.

As usual, I was in the water. Somehow I lost track of my brother, Jack, who was with me. When I pulled myself out, exhausted, I scanned the crowd, looking for someone I recognized. I started walking, dodging people, umbrellas, walking around towels, sunbathers, and family tents. After what seemed like a few hours, which likely meant twenty minutes, I realized I was completely, utterly lost.

No matter where I looked, I didn’t see a single person I recognized. I was just short of panic. It’s a feeling I can recall to this day. I had never been lost before, uncertain about what to do or where to go.

Then, I spotted my dad. Where I was stressed, he was as calm as could be. My heart rate may have been spiking, but not his. He was scanning the area, his eyes making a mechanical sweep of everything. As soon as I saw him, I felt a flood of relief as if one of the waves washed all of the worry away in an instant.

This is one of the first memories I have of my father, and one that’s fitting to remember on Father’s Day. A few years ago, I wrote about 9 Leadership Lessons from Mom. It was so popular that I was interviewed numerous times about my childhood. Today I want to turn that spotlight onto my dad and share some of that fatherly wisdom. Because that day on the beach, I had a realization: when I was lost, I wasn’t really on my own. Dad was looking for me. And he wouldn’t give up until he found me. Still to this day, when I hear a sermon about God leaving the flock of sheep to look for a single lost lamb (Matthew 18:12), I think of my own dad doing that very thing.

 

1. Leaders never stop learning.

My dad loves to learn. His degrees range from electrical engineering to operations research (and many others). He went to seminary and then got an MBA. Even now, he is finishing a doctorate in business. My siblings know that our family was able to “Google” something long before the search engine was even formed. We simply found Dad, inputted the question, and out would come the answer. When the internet first started, I would often find he was faster. And, when we took a family trip, we would have to stop and read every plaque and see more historical sites than anyone else I knew.

Leaders have an insatiable curiosity. The more you learn to ask questions, the more you will learn information that may change the future.

 

“Leaders have insatiable curiosity.” -Skip Prichard

 

2. Leaders serve others first.

When my wife and I were first married, we moved quite a bit. Guess who helped us move? Painted? Took down or put up wallpaper? How about fixing the leaky sinks? Inspecting the house? You’d think he was a contractor until I add that he did our taxes, analyzed the best mortgages, and told us about the history of the area.

Leaders serve others first. Leaders give freely of their time and talents.

 

“Leaders give freely of their time and talents.” -Skip Prichard

 

3. Leaders are thrifty.

That’s another way of saying my dad is uh…cheap. And you’d have to be with only a government salary to raise six kids and numerous others we would take into the family home. The lesson, though, is to look for the value in everything. Don’t overpay. Realize that we need to be good stewards of what we have. Don’t waste anything.

Leaders don’t wish for the impossible; they create results with what they have.

 

“Leaders create results with what they have, not what they wish they had.” -Skip Prichard

 

4. Leaders are not defined by a position.

Yes, he had an important job. He dutifully gave his time and talent to his employer. However, my father didn’t lead at work and then fail at home. He spent time with us. He was loyal to his family, and in particular, to my mom. None of us ever questioned his devotion. And that taught me a powerful lesson about leadership: it isn’t defined by a job.

Leadership is defined by character, not position.

Mom and Dad

“Leadership is defined by character, not position.” -Skip Prichard

 

5. Leaders appreciate the uniqueness of each individual.

My childhood home was a bit unusual. Somehow people found their way to our home when they were in trouble. If you were abused, our home was a place of refuge. We had our share of rather strange people stopping over. I never recall my father judging any of them. They were in need, and so they were welcome. And that was it.

Leaders don’t judge. Leaders appreciate each individual for who they are.

 

“Leaders appreciate each individual for who they are.” -Skip Prichard

 

6. Leaders continually raise the bar.

If I came home with a 93% on a paper, I don’t recall a celebration. Instead, I was asked what I got wrong, why, and did I understand what I did wrong. The focus wasn’t on the criticism, but on learning and on striving to be better. My parents required each of us to learn a musical instrument, too, simply because of the benefits we would accrue by doing that.

Leaders raise the bar. Leaders push those around them to reach for more.

 

“Leaders push those around them to reach for more.” -Skip Prichard

 

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7. Leaders don’t give up.