5 Steps to Your Best Year Ever

Michael Hyatt Best Year Ever

Your Best Year Ever

Michael Hyatt’s new book, Your Best Year Ever: A 5-Step Plan for Achieving Your Most Important Goals, arrived at just the right time for me. I’m in the middle of my contemplative period, the time at the end of the year when I review how things went and look forward into the next.

What do I want to continue? To stop? To start?

Where am I frustrated and stuck? Where am I effective and seemingly unstoppable?

It’s a process I’ve gone through most of my life.

This year it seemed I need a boost, a grounding, something to spur on my thinking.

That’s when the delivery arrived. I knew immediately what it was from the packaging. Michael is a close friend, and he sent the book ahead of its release as an early gift. Of course, I already pre-ordered the book, so now I will have two copies, which is perfect. It’s a book I will be buying for others to spread its message.

It’s hard to describe the book. Knowing Michael, I expected a goal-setting system, but it’s far more than that. It is filled with research and stories that I found extraordinarily motivational.

The five steps are deceptively simple:

  1. Believe the possibility.
  2. Complete the past.
  3. Design your future.
  4. Find your why.
  5. Make it happen.

 

Here are some of my favorite quotes from the book:

 

“Goals poorly formulated are goals easily forgotten.” -@MichaelHyatt

“When we focus on belief improvement, often our circumstances follow suit.” -@MichaelHyatt

“The first key difference between an unmet goal and personal success is the belief that it can be achieved.” -@MichaelHyatt

“The best way to overcome limiting beliefs is to replace them with liberating truths.” -@MichaelHyatt

“Upgrading your beliefs is the first step toward experiencing your best year ever.” -@MichaelHyatt

“The only people with no hope are those with no regrets.” -@MichaelHyatt

“Gratitude has the potential to amplify everything good in our lives.” -@MichaelHyatt

6 Things to Consider When Returning to Work After An Illness

This is a guest post by Mark Moore. Mark’s foundation has raised millions for charitable causes. As an executive, he raised billions in capital and was previously the CFO of Segovia and USA Mobile Communications, where he completed their IPO.

I experienced two strokes in quick succession. The second almost ended my life. When I was awakened – after life-saving brain surgery and several weeks in an induced coma – I found myself in a diminished state physically, mentally, and emotionally. It was only after months of intensive physical therapy, the support of friends and family, and by the Grace of God, that I was able to resume something like my normal life.

Three months after the strokes I returned to work, first on a very limited basis and, sometime later, full time.

I’d like to share what I learned about the work reentry process in the hope that my experiences will make it easier for others to move back to their jobs as they recover from a brain trauma or, perhaps, other debilitating illnesses.

 

Listen to your body.

Your body will let you know what you are capable of doing or not doing. For me, fatigue was a major issue. Throughout my career I could push through my fatigue and just keep going. Not anymore. Now, I try to stay aware of my energy levels and slow down or stop at the first sign of weariness.

 

“The mind’s first step to self awareness must be through the body.” –George Sheehan

 

Listen to your doctors and physical therapists as well.

They can anticipate many of the bumps you will be facing on your road to recovery that may catch you unaware. That doesn’t mean you can’t negotiate with them a bit when you have a difference of opinion. Mine were somewhat reluctant to agree that I was ready to return to work. But I explained to them that I was the COO and would be sitting behind a desk, not doing any kind of stressful physical labor. They agreed to my plan, only asking me to pace my re-entry into the company.

 

Pace yourself.