Karin Slaughter on Setting, Procrastination and the Importance of Libraries

When I first met my now good friend Karin Slaughter several years ago, I’m not sure what I was expecting.  All of her books are nail-biting thrillers.

The night before I met her, one of her books kept me up all night.  Her expertise in crime scenes, forensics and police procedure is carefully woven into compelling stories designed to keep you turning pages.  I guess I pictured a wild-eyed, half-crazed author with blood splattered on her shirt.  Instead, I discovered someone who was warm, irreverent and spontaneously funny.

Karin’s writing talent regularly lands her at the top of the New York Times bestselling lists.  Her many books have sold tens of millions of copies around the world.

Karin’s latest book is called Criminal. 

Goals: Make the Second Half Count

Image courtesy of istockphoto/alexsl

Do you remember the Road Runner cartoon?  Wile E. Coyote would be chasing Road Runner who would “beep, beep!” and manage to slip away.  Always two steps ahead of the coyote, Road Runner just outmaneuvered him in every episode.

I remember when the coyote would run right off a cliff in pursuit.  And he would dramatically just keep running on air, not realizing that he wasn’t on solid ground.  Though it was predictable, you would see the sudden realization, the pause, the expression and then the inevitable fall.

As a kid, I identified with the road runner.  We were outsmarting our opponent.  We just laughed at that coyote.  How could he be so stupid?  Every single week, he repeated the same mistakes.  How could you be running so fast that you don’t realize you just ran off a cliff?

I watched one of those old cartoons today, and I looked at it from a completely different perspective.  Instead of identifying with the road runner, I saw the coyote with new empathy.

Lee Greenwood Asks: Does God Still Bless the USA?


Even if you can’t recite the first verse, I’m certain that you know the chorus.

Read this and I’m sure your mind will start hearing the song.  Warning:  It may stay with you for the rest of the day.

Here are the first four lines of the chorus:

And I’m proud to be an American,

Where at least I know I’m free.

And I won’t forget the men who died,

Who gave that right to me.

In your head, isn’t it?

For those of us in the United States, it’s one of the most powerful, patriotic songs ever.  Whatever your background and whatever your political party, you likely are swept by the emotion of the song and its sentiment.

It was written years ago by Lee Greenwood.  He has since sung that song all over the world.  For Presidents.  In stadiums.  On a plane’s intercom flying over the World Trade Center site.  In dangerous situations around the world.