The Outs and Ins of Employee Loyalty

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What’s In and What’s Out?

The era of employees signing up to work at a single company for their entire adult lives has long been over.  The importance of differentiating and branding yourself has never been more important.  The best employees have options. They are always on a recruiter’s radar. They often have a resume ready. If your best hope of retaining them is a counteroffer, then you have already lost the war. Consider these ideas if you want to increase your employee retention.

OUT

Helping employees only with their jobs and specific skills to improve productivity.

IN

Helping employees with their lives, which recognizes them as individuals who have needs outside of work.

OUT

Keeping employees at arm’s length and in a strict business relationship. Getting too close clouds your judgment.

IN

Taking the time to know them. Ignore the old advice and become friends. Employees are more likely to be loyal to someone considered a friend.

OUT

Telling employees that promotions are rare, that Jane is never going to retire and to “forget it,” that they will be blocked from transferring elsewhere.

IN

Brainstorming various ways to boost earnings, potential and career options to move within a company.

OUT

Employees nodding their heads like parrots at everything the boss says.

IN

Constructive disagreement, polite dissent, and compromise.

Employee Loyalty

OUT

The rulebook. Everything has a strict procedure and no room for individual deviations or decisions.

IN

Empowerment. If you can’t trust the employee, you hired the wrong person.

OUT

A strict, hierarchical structure of command and control.

IN

A matrix organization, team collaboration and fluid communications.

OUT

Complete denial that an employee would ever consider leaving the organization.

IN

Recognize that they will eventually leave, and help them develop skills for their future elsewhere.  Paradoxically, the more you are helping them develop marketable skills, the more likely they will stick around.

OUT

Treating employees as a number on a badge, with rank and privilege based only on tenure.

IN

Treating employees as associates or members with respect based on performance.

OUT

A culture of fear.

IN

A culture of innovation, rewards, acceptance, allowing failure and experimentation, and respecting individuals.

OUT

Managers who think, “Your job is your reward,” and, “You’re lucky to have a job in this economy.”

IN

Leaders who are fair, honest, and frequently praise good work, who give rewards in multiple forms including monetary and also recognition.

OUT

Requiring perfection.

IN

A learning environment.

OUT

Employees left in the dark, not knowing how they are doing until an annual performance review.

IN

Managers who give effective employee feedback and keep them engaged.

 

 

Why do you think employees stay loyal? What are ways to increase employee retention? You can leave a comment by clicking here.
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