The 8 Biggest Mobile Mistakes Companies Make

 

Over 6 billion people around the world have access to a mobile device.  Time points out that more people have access to a mobile phone than toilets.   These devices are now so important to us that they are almost an extension of our bodies.

As a lawyer, I was captivated to see what the Supreme Court would rule in Riley v. California.  In a rare 9-0 decision, the Supreme Court recognized the importance of mobile devices and held that the police need a warrant to search cell phones.  Even the Supreme Court knows:

Mobile is changing everything.

 

Fact: Half of all local internet searches are performed on mobile devices. –SmartInsights.com

 

The Mobile Revolution

Tom Eslinger, Saatchi & Saatchi’s Worldwide Director of Digital and Social is an expert on mobile marketing.  His recent book The Saatchi & Saatchi Guide to Mobile Marketing got my attention.  It is filled with facts about mobile and a peek into our mobile future.  Tom has helped brands like Toyota, Coca-Cola, T-Mobile, Lexus, Visa, Sony Ericsson, Heineken, and Procter & Gamble with mobile, augmented reality and games.  Who better than Tom to share insights on how organizations are using mobile today?

 

You are enthusiastic about mobile (understatement!). Why?

We can see a steady trend over the last five years in major industries, beginning with the retail consumer marketing-structure as it becomes more fluent with mobile technology.  Mobile devices have already exceeded desktops.  We, consumers, are essentially becoming a culture of detachment and wirelessness.  So, having a mobile-first strategy will be critical for any company over the next five years – and perhaps even the next five months.

 

“Having a mobile-first strategy will be critical for any company over the next five years.” –Tom Eslinger

 

Tom, what are the top mistakes companies are making with mobile?

 

1. Don’t Support Your Campaign

The importance of maintaining your mobile presence can’t be stressed enough.  Slacking off on maintenance can sabotage the best-laid plans.  This means keeping your audience engaged, often at multiple levels of engagement.  And of course, you need to pay attention to the stuff that keeps it all going: server networks, customer care, and technical support.  You can expect to spend around 1.5 times your creation costs on on-going marketing and program maintenance costs.  It’s that important.

 

“Keep your customer at the center of the experience so they keep coming back for more.” –Tom Eslinger

 

2. Think You Have No Bugs

No programmer has ever built anything bug-free from the get-go.

It’s guaranteed that the first version of your mobile product—and many subsequent versions—are going to have some bugs that make it past the testing period.  It’s nothing to panic about, but continue to iterate on your product after it’s released.

 

3. Don’t Keep Up Interest in Your Mobile App

Don’t just let it sit there!

Have an extended plan for the app.  How are you going to update it, change it, push new content through it, and ultimately, perhaps know when to end it?  Push notifications can get really annoying really fast, so make them relevant and desirable.  Have the copywriters rewrite the engineers’ reports in your brand’s voice.

 

Fact: 42 percent of consumers using a mobile while in-store spend more than $1000. IAB

 

4. Try to Do Too Much

Are You A Lovemark?

This is a guest post by Brian Sheehan. Brian is Associate Professor of Advertising at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, Syracuse University. Previously he was with global creative powerhouse Saatchi & Saatchi, with CEO roles at Team One Advertising and at Saatchi & Saatchi Australia and Japan. Brian is the author of Loveworks: How the world’s top marketers make emotional connections to win in the marketplace (powerHouse Books).

No matter how much we think we have grasped it, love remains full of surprises. Most of us would say that we know what love feels like, but try to get people to explain what makes love happen (and how to keep it alive!), and you’ll find that that there are no guaranteed solutions. If we take our understanding of interpersonal love and apply it to brand love, the needs of the relationship share some similar characteristics.

So I hear you ask, how do I know if my brand has reached Lovemark status? Here’s a fast way to do it. Though Love tends to dominate conversations about Lovemarks, people forget about its non-negotiable partner, Respect. Without Respect, a brand can never be a Lovemark. It’s impossible to love something that you can’t trust or rely on.

It’s impossible to love something that you can’t trust or rely on. -Brian Sheehan

Ask yourself:

  • Does your brand perform best in class each and every time?
  • Does your brand stand for things your customers believe in and admire?
  • Is your brand good value for the experience it offers?BrianSheehan246

If you answer “no” to any one of those questions, you need to focus on building Respect before you get ahead of yourself. If you answered “yes” to all the questions, you can move on to thinking about building Love. Look at the questions below and see where you rate strongly and how your brand may need work. Love can get stronger — and weaker. Your job is to ensure that the hearts of your consumers only get bigger for your brand.

Mystery stimulates excitement, surprise and wonder. It’s the stuff that dreams are made of. To have Mystery, a brand needs to take on the role of storyteller: draw on its past, present and future; and also inspire people to dream.

  • Do people share positive stories about your brand?
  • Is your brand recognizable through an icon, logo, symbol or mythic character?
  • Do people feel inspired by your brand?

Sensuality involves interacting with our senses. Sight, sound, touch, smell and taste are direct connections to our emotions, and brands that have strong connections with their consumers provide distinct sensory experiences.

Your job is to ensure that the hearts of your consumers only get bigger for your brand. Brian Sheehan

  • Does your brand deliver the best in design?
  • What is the sound of your brand?
  • Does your brand deliver a physical sensation that people can’t find in anything else?

 

Loveworks-Cover-Front-highdpi

Intimacy is where we get up close and personal, and it involves Empathy, Commitment and Passion. Consumers today want to be understood and feel cared for.

  • Do you act on feedback provided by your customers? Do you listen to them?
  • Do your customers have confidence that if something went wrong, you will do the right thing and fix the problem quickly?
  • Does your brand gain new business by referral?