10 Ways to Reduce Stress

This is a guest post by Charu Chandra, an aspiring leader, entrepreneur, and blogger. Charu blogs about the beneficial effects of yoga and strength training and other things fitness-related.

 

A good leader is expected to always remain in control of his emotions.

But like it or not, things don’t always go according to plan, and leaders, even good ones, are prone to emotional outbursts. And if stress is not recognized and corrected early, it usually snowballs into bigger problems.

So, it is imperative that a leader remains calm at all times. As you may have experienced, situations only tend to get worse when approached with stress.

10 ways to reduce stress in your life

1) Tidy up your workspace/room.

A cluttered room or workspace is a great way to build up stress. I have noticed that removing all unnecessary items from my desk (all I have on my desk is my laptop and a glass of water), making my bed every morning, etc. keeps my mind really calm.

 

“The objective of cleaning is not just to clean, but to feel happiness living in that environment.” -Marie Kondo

 

2) Tidy up your inbox/computer/desktop.

Since we spend a lot of time on our computers and smart phones, keeping them clutter-free is as important as keeping our physical workspace clean. For example, until recently, I had close to 7,000 unread e-mails in my inbox.  So I sat down for three hours and cleaned up the entire thing. Once I was done, I felt incredibly relaxed and peaceful.  So make sure you don’t let things get out of hand in the virtual world.

 

“One way to organize your thoughts is to tidy up, even if it’s in places where it makes no sense at all.” -Ursus Wehrli

 

3) Speak your mind.

One of the sources of stress in my life was my roommate. He used to go to bed late and would always play video games loudly late at night when I was asleep. So, the second or third time I was disturbed, I got up from bed and talked to him about this. This helped a lot as I let go of the anger in me and also because the noise stopped. So, if something needs to be said, say it.

 

“Stand before the people you fear and speak your mind, even if your voice shakes.” -Maggie Kuhn

 

4) Pinpoint the source of your stress.

Stress is not always general. Sometimes, specific events or people can stress you out. For example, a job interview scheduled for tomorrow may be causing you stress today. In my experience, the best way to deal with such situations is to do everything you can to address it and leave the rest to god/fate/luck.

5) Give up control.

Trying to control situations too much can cause stress. Don’t misunderstand me, leaders should always be in control of a situation but shouldn’t expect to be in control of its outcome. A good leader adapts to whatever turn a situation takes and is always ready for anything. Using the interview example from above, I do my best to prepare for it and then relax. Because I know that there will always be unexpected events no matter how well I prepare.

6) Take a break.

If you’ve been working hard on something, taking a short break to get away from it all is always a good idea. Taking a walk, playing with an animal or a baby, watching television, listening to calming music, taking a nap and exercising are all great ways to de-stress. Find out what helps you relax.

Sonia Sotomayor

Use Your Gut to Make Smart Business Decisions

intuition

Decisive Intuition

In a business world increasingly relying on data to make its biggest decisions, including hiring, growth, product development, and sales, international business consultant Rick Snyder calls upon business leaders to develop and follow intuitive intelligence as a powerful tool that should be combined with data analytics for superior decision-making.

Intuition is distinct from instinct, thought, or bias, and is a critical skill to build. It’s a differentiator. In Rick’s experience, intuition can be taught. In his new book, Decisive Intuition: Use Your Gut to Make Smart Business Decisions, Rick shares his research and techniques to master intuition.

 

“If you don’t listen to your intuition, you’ll feel empty inside even if you’re ‘successful.'” -Rick Snyder

 

Tap Into Your Intuition

What is your definition of intuition? How can we tap into it?

My practical definition of intuition is ‘an embodied knowing that comes from listening to what happens next.’ In other words, it’s a knowing that doesn’t just come from our conscious mind, but from being open to all of our senses. This requires an element of being receptive, where we listen to all of the cues and signals that we are picking up on internally and externally, to help us make the best decisions possible. We can tap into this by using hindsight to learn about how our intuitive language uniquely speaks to us. In other words, when you had an inner sense about something and did or didn’t listen to it, how did the message come to you? Was it a feeling, images, a sound, or something from your dream state, which is where our subconscious mind helps us process and connect the dots from our day? The more we slow down, put down the distractions, tune-in to our inner language and listen, the more we create the space for our intuition to find us.

 

“The more we slow down, put down the distractions, tune-in to our inner language and listen, the more we create the space for our intuition to find us.” -Rick Snyder

 

You start with a compelling story on intuition. What do many of us get wrong when we are thinking about it?

What Coffee, Hats, and Brooms Teach About Servant Leadership

 

Click above to watch the video interview with Howard Behar

“Leadership is about being of service to others, not being served by others. Be a mentor, not a boss.” -Howard Behar

 

The Importance of Servant Leadership

 

I have had the privilege of giving keynotes on servant leadership all over the world. I’m passionate about this leadership style, and I am always reading and learning all I can about it.

That’s why I am thrilled to talk with Howard Behar. Howard is the former President of Starbuck’s North America and the founding President of Starbucks International. When he joined, Starbucks had 28 stores and he helped grow it to over 15,000 stores on five continents. He was also on the Board of Directors for twelve years.

What I love about Howard is this: he could have stopped and enjoyed the fruits of his labor. But he instead mentors and teaches on servant leadership. He wrote two books:

 

It’s Not About the Coffee

 

And

 

The Magic Cup.

 

“The person who sweeps the floor should choose the broom.” -Howard Behar

 

Did you know that servant leadership played a major role in the growth of Starbucks? Did you know that its culture is based on the concepts?

 

“Do it because it’s right, not because it’s right for your resume.” -Howard Behar

 

We talked about a range of subjects:

Juliana Rotich