5 Simple Steps To Blow Your Productivity Through The Roof

This is a guest post by Tor Refsland. Tor decided to leave his six-figure job to follow his passion – to help online entrepreneurs free up more time, so they can do what they love. Want to become more productive? Download his free eBook and learn how to double your productivity in 7 days.

Have you ever experienced this?

You are sitting with your laptop late at night and you have had waaaay too many cups of coffee. You could probably have stopped with your cup number 5, since your body seems to have become temporarily immune to the invigorating effect of the caffeine.

This is NOT the way you wanted to spend your evening. However, you know that you didn`t have a choice. It was a choice about YOUR life and death.

You have procrastinated for so long, and while you were looking the other way, your neglected tasks formed an evil alliance to bring you down.

You know for a fact that if you can’t handle the ever-growing to do list tonight, you will drown.

Can you relate?

If so, no worries. I’ve been there, too.

Relax, there is still hope.

Let me show you the 5 simple steps to blow your productivity through the roof today.

 

“The big difference between successful people and people who aren’t is how they spend their time.” -Tor Refsland

 

 

1. Long-term goal setting

Step 1 is to have clarity and know where you want to go. This should be a long-term goal.

They say that successful people are good at making decisions that will bring them closer to their long-term goal, while people who are not successful make decisions that give them a quick reward.

Life and business are like chess.  A good chess player has the ability to think many moves ahead.

What is the best destination for your business and life?  Do you know what you want to achieve?

Find out and then set the correct goals.

Great, let`s move over to the next step…

 

2. Planning

Brian Tracy says that every minute spent in planning saves you 10 minutes in execution.

You should put all your tasks in your master to do list.

What does that mean?

It means that you should have ONE to do list. How many?

One.

 

“Every minute you spend in planning saves 10 minutes in execution.” -Brian Tracy

 

There are 3 methods when it comes to handling your to do list.

A. Plan your to do list one week in advance

B. Review your to do list the night before

C. Review your to do list first thing in the morning

You probably think that method A will take some time, and it does. However, it will make you crazy productive. This is for the hardcore people who want BIG results.

I would at least recommend you to use method B and C.

The big difference between successful people and people who aren’t is how they spend their time.

Needless to say, if you don’t already use a to do list, you should start now.

If you have many to do lists, start using one.

Okay, you get the importance of a to do list.

Then over to the…

 

3. 80/20 rule

How to Make Your Next Meeting the Most Effective Ever

Do I Have To Go?

In every corporation and social enterprise, we find ourselves in meetings.  We dread going to them.  We love to complain about them.  We poke ourselves to stay awake in them.

Have you ever thought about how important meetings really are?

Ever consider that how you behave in a meeting may have more of an impact on your career?

What if there was a way to turn meetings into “remarkable conversations”?

 

Paul Axtell’s new book,  Meetings Matter: 8 Powerful Strategies for Remarkable Conversations, was a surprise.  Why a surprise?  Because I admit I have groaned about too many meetings, so the thought of reading a book about them was supposed to be my cure for insomnia.  Instead, I found myself reading and re-reading it.  If your calendar has you stuck in too many ineffective meetings, you will find numerous solutions to changing the game in Paul’s new book.

Paul Axtell has been a personal effectiveness consultant and corporate trainer for 35 years.  All of that experience is put too good use in a book packed with advice to be more effective.  Note: this book goes far, far beyond the meeting.

 

“It took me fifteen years to make it look easy.” –Fred Astaire

 

Meetings Matter

Everyone loves to complain about meetings. Too many, too long, too boring. But your new book says meetings matter. Why are meetings such an easy target?

Meetings Matter CoverFirst, the complaints are usually justified.  Our time in ineffective meetings far outweighs our time in powerful meetings.  People are genuinely concerned about being more productive and taking less work home, so time not well spent is galling.  Finally, no one is standing up for the value and leverage that meetings can provide to a project or organization.  We’ve drifted into this place where we complain and don’t even hear ourselves complaining.  Poorly run meetings also start at the top, and from below it can seem like an impossible problem to confront. 

Paul, you raise the stakes to say, “Meetings are at the heart of an effective organization.”

Yes, if we include one-on-ones, meetings compromise most of a supervisor’s or manager’s day.  Meetings are a place and situation where clarity can be achieved, decisions made, alignment garnered and actions identified – all of which work to help forward the work of any organization.  Therefore, meeting skills are a core competency for employees.

 

“One of the most beautiful qualities of true friendship is to understand and to be understood.” –Seneca

 

Choose Your Perspective

Your new book outlines eight strategies for more effective meetings.  Let me ask about just a few.  Number one “Choose the perspective.”  It’s about being intentional, mindful, and catching yourself if you fall into negativity about a meeting.  Why is perspective the starting point?

I believe two things change behavior: perspective and awareness.  Perspective might be the more important of the two because with a disempowering perspective, strategies and tactics have less impact.  We’ve drifted into three perspectives that set us up for failure—meetings don’t matter, it’s not my meeting, and I don’t have to fully engage if I don’t want to.  Very difficult to run a good meeting when people walk in with these points of view.  Just imagine how it would be to lead a meeting where everyone walked in with an attitude that was shaped instead by these perspectives: meetings are leverage and I’m responsible for making this meeting turn out?

 

“It is indispensable to have a habit of observation and reflection.” –Abraham Lincoln

 

The 4 C’s of An Effective Conversation

Procrastinate on Purpose

Learn How to Be A Multiplier

If you’ve tried all of the tips, tricks, tools, apps, checklists, planners and technology gimmicks to improve your productivity, you may wonder why it is that you still haven’t mastered your time.

 

“Creating the next level of results requires the next level of thinking.” –Rory Vaden

 

My friend Rory Vaden, cofounder of international company Southwestern Consulting, NYT bestselling author of Take the Stairs: 7 Steps to Achieving True Success, says that:

  • Everything you know about time management is wrong.
  • The most productive people in the world do things differently.
  • We need to understand the emotional aspects of time management.
  • We need to learn how to multiply our time.
  • We need to learn how to procrastinate on purpose.

9780399170621His new book, Procrastinate on Purpose: 5 Permissions to Multiply Your Time has just been released. A few weeks ago, I sat down with Rory to talk about his extensive research into time management.

If you want to be more productive, more effective, more impactful – and who doesn’t – Rory’s research will propel you along.

 

3 Types of Procrastination

1: Classic procrastination

2: Creative avoidance

3: Priority dilution

 

3 Types of Procrastination

Learn about the 3 different types of procrastination:

50 Things to Drop Before the New Year

The Eliminate List

There are some things that we just need to eliminate.  Don’t take them into next year.  Here’s a few in random order of what we can all drop:

  1. Grudges
  2. Anger
  3. Toxic habits
  4. Clutter
  5. Negative thoughts
  6. People who drag you down
  7. Limiting language
  8. Bitterness
  9. Extra weight
  10. Unrealistic expectations
  11. Self righteousness
  12. Meanness
  13. Rudeness
  14. Partially hydrogenated anything
  15. Hatred
  16. Swearing
  17. Excuses
  18. Distractions
  19. Blind spots
  20. Frivolous spending
  21. Busywork
  22. Being cheap
  23. Drags
  24. Texting while driving
  25. Lateness
  26. Limiting beliefs
  27. Road rage
  28. Time wasters
  29. Doing it all alone
  30. Too much screen time
  31. Laziness
  32. Jealousy
  33. Stress
  34. Old clothes
  35. Gossip
  36. Debt
  37. Correcting others
  38. Perfectionism
  39. Self-sabotage
  40. Roadblocks
  41. Procrastination
  42. “Um” and other filler words
  43. Junk food
  44. Worry
  45. Sense of entitlement
  46. Thinking the worst about people
  47. High blood pressure
  48. Empty and false promises
  49. Seeking the approval of others
  50. Some money in an envelope and send it to your favorite charity.

How to Get Through Your Writing Faster

This is a guest post by Laura Brown, PhD, author of How to Write Anything: A Complete Guide. It is a terrific guide full of everything from writing apologies, thank you notes, and even fighting parking tickets. Dr. Brown has taught composition at Columbia University and has more than 25 years experience coaching business writing. More info.

 

Fact: we spend 28% of our time at work reading and writing email.

 

According to a 2012 study from the McKinsey Global Institute, we now spend an average of 28% of our time at work reading and writing e-mails.  That’s a total of 81 days a year spent on e-mail alone.  Another study, from the Radicati Group, found that the average corporate worker processes an average of 105 e-mails every day.  Any way you look at it, that’s an extraordinary investment of time and brainpower, and these numbers cover only e-mail, not the other kinds of writing we do at work.  What would it be like to get some of that time and energy back to devote to other projects, or just to take a deep breath once in a while?

Writing is likely to remain an important part of the average workday, but there are ways to streamline your writing process so that you can get through your writing tasks in less time. These tips can help.

 

Discover Your Process

In my consulting practice, I find many people think they’re doing writing “wrong.”  They have some notion from a high school or college writing class — or from business writing training at some point — that there is a “correct” way to approach a writing task, and they’re sure they’re doing it wrong.  The fact is that there are many different successful ways to get your writing done.  One of the keys to success in writing, and to accelerating your writing process, is to discover the process that works best for you.

Writing is typically taught as a linear process: first you consider your purpose and your reader, then you brainstorm content, then you create an outline, then you write a draft, and finally you revise that draft.  There’s nothing wrong with that process, unless it doesn’t work for you.  Many people find that a less linear approach feels more natural.  You can start to discover your own best process by simply observing how you typically start a writing project.  Do you like to have an outline before you start?  Do you jump right in and write a draft?  Do you consider your objectives before you start to write?  These are all potentially excellent ways to get started on a writing task.

Once you understand the writing process that works best for you, run with it.  Stop beating yourself up about doing it “wrong,” and find ways to work with your own approach. Becoming more conscious of your writing habits and embracing your own preferred style will accelerate your writing, no matter the task at hand.

 

To Speed Up, Slow Down

One of the best ways to speed up your writing is often to slow down a little.  Taking a minute to think before you write can save you a lot of time over the long run.  This trick can be especially useful with e-mail.  Before you compose an e-mail, ask yourself these two questions: “What am I trying to achieve with this message?” and “Who is my reader and what do they expect from me?”  This simple, time-saving matrix will force you to isolate and refine your message before you even start writing it.  Your e-mail will be more concise, and you’ll be less likely to omit important content (and less likely to have to follow up because of it).  You can use the same kind of matrix when you read and reply to e-mails: ask yourself “What is the purpose of this message?” and “What is my reader asking of me?”  Slowing down just long enough to ask and answer these questions will speed up your e-mail processing overall.