29 Ways to Celebrate World Hello Day

World Hello Day

 

Hallo. Ciao! Hallo. Ni hao! Hola. Marhaba! Shalom. Bonjour!

November 21 is World Hello Day.

What are you supposed to do on World Hello Day? Greet 10 people. That’s it.

 

“For every goodbye, God also provides a hello.” –Donna Gable Hatch

 

The idea is to encourage the resolution of conflicts through communication instead of force. Sure, we can all point to examples where this is not possible. We may call it idealistic. Still, I like having a day where we can celebrate the power of communication. It’s easy to cite the examples where it is difficult, but there are far more conflicts resolved through negotiation than any other method.

 

“Don’t tell your friends about your indigestion. ‘How are you’ is a greeting, not a question.” –Arthur Guiterman

 

Let’s celebrate that today by sharing World Hello Day with others.

 

29 Ways to Celebrate

Here are a few suggestions on how to make World Hello Day worthwhile:

Greet others enthusiastically today.

 

“When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace.” -Jimi Hendrix

 

Introduce yourself to strangers and tell them about World Hello Day.

Share this post with someone you haven’t said hello to in a while.

Let someone cut in front of you in line.

 

“Send out a cheerful, positive greeting, and most of the time you will get back a cheerful, positive greeting.” –Zig Ziglar

 

Make today a day of happiness.

Spend some extra time with a good friend.

Have your team at work write down five things that you are grateful for.

Encourage someone.

Radiate peace and joy.

Make today the day that you forgive someone for good.

 

“The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.” -Gandhi

 

Allow a driver into your lane.

 

“How glorious a greeting the sun gives the mountains!” –John Muir

 

Send Facebook messages or Tweets to 3 people who you admire.

Compliment others sincerely today.

7 Tenets of Taxi Terry

It Started With A Question

 

“Are you ready for the best cab ride of your life?”

When the door slammed shut, Scott McKain wasn’t only taking a cab ride to his hotel.  He was embarking on one of the greatest customer experiences he could imagine.  Not only would Scott enjoy a memorable cab ride, he would exit that taxi with lessons that can make a difference in every business.

 

Research: 73% of customers will do business with you because of friendly employees.

 

 

The taxi driver, Taxi Terry, didn’t know that he had just picked up my friend, bestselling author, extraordinary professional speaker, and customer service expert Scott McKain.  Of all the people in the world to pick up at the airport, Taxi Terry picked up a global expert in standing out, in the art of distinction. In fact, he is the Chairman of the Distinction Institute.

 

7 Tenets of Taxi Terry

  1. Set high expectations and then exceed them.
  2. Delivering what helps the customer helps you.
  3. Customers are people, so personalize their experience.
  4. Think logically and then act creatively and consistently.
  5. Make the customer the star of your show.
  6. Help your customers come back for more.
  7. Creating joy for your customer will make your work–and life–more joyful.

 

That simple, enthusiastic question, directed to an exhausted traveler one night was the beginning of a customer experience that tens of thousands of people have learned from. Scott has presented the lessons he learned to audiences around the world.  And the lessons are now available in a new book, one that will inspire you.  7 Tenets of Taxi Terry is sure to be one of the enduring business books that will come up in conversations everywhere (yes, even in a cab!).

 

“If you want your business to get better, the first step is for you to get better.” –Scott McKain

 

Do You Want to Create Memorable Customer Experiences?

Saying More With Less

 

Have you ever tuned out in a meeting because the speaker is rambling?

Do you find your mind wandering when listening? 

What happens when someone does not get to the point?

 

Recently, I read BRIEF: Make a Bigger Impact by Saying Less by Joseph McCormack.  He is the founder of a boutique marketing agency, The Sheffield Company, with clients ranging from Harley-Davidson to MasterCard.  I had the opportunity to ask him a few questions about the power of brevity.

 

Talk to the point and stop when you have reached it. –F.V. Irish

 

I love the message of this book.  In my interactions, I am constantly asking for headlines and bottom lines. Or I am famous for flipping to the last page of the PowerPoint to see where it all ends.  Why is brevity more important today than ever before?

We have passed the point where people can handle the volumes of information that’s headed their way. The result is a divided mind that is highly inattentive and constantly interrupted. The average attention span is now eight seconds, which is one second less than a goldfish. People that cannot get to the point and command others’ (in)attention face the real risk of being ignored and overlooked.

 

Simplicity is the glory of expression. –Walt Whitman

 

You discuss what you call the 7 Capital Sins that interfere with the goal.  In your work, have you seen one or two that consistently rank the highest for busy executives?

The 7 Capital Sins are: cowardice, confidence, callousness, comfort, confusion, complication, and carelessness. They represent the subtle, and often unconscious, sins that can keep up from being succinct naturally, and I go into them more in-depth and provide strategies to circumvent them in my book.

 

7 Capital Sins

  1. Cowardice
  2. Confidence
  3. Callousness
  4. Comfort
  5. Confusion
  6. Complication
  7. Carelessness

Confidence and comfort, in particular, are two sins committed often by professionals, particularly senior executives. When people are knowledgeable and have authority, they tend to be so confident that they want to share everything they know. Given their position of responsibility, those around them have little choice but to buckle themselves in for a long ride. In a similar vein, executives are proud and fall in love with the sound of their own voice. They get so comfortable that it’s like a snowball running down a steep hill.

 

Get to the point or pay the price. –Joseph McCormack

 

Storytelling is powerful.  Why does storytelling trump persuasion?

The Price of Right

You’re sitting at your desk when the call comes in from your boss.

“You were right.  I was flat out wrong.  I want to thank you for working here and having the vision that we all lack.  You called it.  Never again will I doubt you.” 

You straighten up in your chair, basking in your newfound status of business wizard.

Seem far-fetched?  That’s because it is.  It’s unlikely to happen in this lifetime.

Then why do we strive for it?

Why The Joy of Being Right is Wrong

So much of our life is spent trying to be right.  Correcting others.  Carefully editing others’ statements as if we were polishing an encyclopedia, making sure everything was just perfect.

We spend so much time on defense when we should be on offense.

Think of the wasted energy.

Think of the wasted mind power.

Think of what we could do if we didn’t resist that individual’s energy, but built on it and moved it forward with additional new thinking.

 

The joy of being right is short-lived. The joy of peace lasts a lifetime. -Skip Prichard

 

Let’s have less of this:

Reaching Your Peak Performance

“Does your performance reflect your potential?” is a question posed by Scott Addis in the introduction of his new book.  It’s a question I have often asked of myself and of others over the years. Reaching your potential, hitting peak performance, and achieving your best self are different ways to talk about the subject of personal success.  I recently had the opportunity to talk with Scott about his thoughts on maximizing performance.

Confident people risk security to achieve higher levels of growth and independence. -Scott Addis

 

Scott Addis is the President and CEO of The Addis Group and Beyond Insurance, and author of SUMMIT: Reach Your Peak And Elevate Your Customers’ Experience. Beyond Insurance is a coaching and consulting company whose purpose is to transform the process that insurance agents, brokers and carriers use when working with clients. Scott is recognized as an industry leader having been awarded the Inc. Magazine’s “Entrepreneur of the Year” Award as well as “25 Most Innovative Agents in America”.

SUMMIT is divided into four elevations.  What are the four elevations?  Why is the book organized this way?

When it came to putting the material into a book, I thought it seemed natural to organize and edit the writings into a sequence that reflected a progression from individual skill development to business relationships to the customer experience.  Summit is therefore divided into the following four elevations:

 

Elevation I: Preparing for the Climb (Developing Your Personal Readiness)

Elevation II:  Setting up Base Camp (Preparing to Present Yourself to Others)

Elevation III:  On to the Summit (Focusing on the Customer Experience)

Elevation IV:  The Final Ascent (Discovering Your Inner Strengths)

In Elevation I, you emphasize the importance of paying attention to four performance indicators and developing them as the reader progresses.  One of these performance indicators is natural strength.  Why is it crucial to focus on honing natural strengths rather than improving weaknesses?

Every person who has ever lived has natural strengths (also known as Unique Abilities) though most people are not conscious of them.  Because of this lack of awareness, these people have not experienced the infinite rewards that come from being able to harness and develop their natural talents and pursue their passions wholeheartedly.  The more you are able to recognize your natural strengths and shape your life around them, the more freedom, success and happiness you will experience.  Your Unique Abilities (i.e., Natural Strengths) have four characteristics:

  1. A superior ability that other people notice and value
  2. Love doing it and want to do it as much as possible
  3. Energizing for you and others around you
  4. You keep getting better, never running out of possibilities for further improvement

Most individuals are not able to identify their natural strengths, let alone concentrate on them, because they are trapped by childhood training.  We learn at a young age that the secret to success in life is working on our weaknesses.  Unfortunately, it is the focus on weaknesses that results in a sense of deficiency, failure and guilt.  As a result, our lives are filled with frustration, wasted potential and missed opportunities.  Letting go of these “lack of abilities” to focus on the things you love is a key to maximizing your performance.

 

Innovation is the lifeblood of the peak performer. -Scott Addis

 

In Elevation III, you discuss the customer experience.  What is the customer experience?  Why are the first impressions so significant in building customer relationships?

The Customer Experience Journey is the sum of all experiences that the customer has with you and your firm, the actions and results that make the customer feel important, understood, heard and respected.  Each customer interaction molds and shapes the Journey.

A first impression is the mark you make in the first moments of interacting with someone.  This impression has a strong effect on one’s intellect, feelings, or conscience.

It is interesting to note that the brain is immensely perceptive and takes into account every minor detail of another’s facial features.  The sight and sound around us are picked up by sense organs and the signals are passed to the brain.  These signals are then compared to the memories of past experiences.  The interpretations of these signals play a key role in forming the first impression.Addis_jacket.indd

In your book, you write:  “Work-life balance remains my biggest challenge in my quest to reach the peak.”  How do you define work-life balance?  Why is it difficult to achieve equilibrium between the two?

The term “work/life balance” first appeared in the 1970’s.  The expression means having equilibrium among all the priorities in your life.  It is interesting to note that this state of balance differs from person to person.  However, if there is little or no balance over an extended period of time, the vast majority of people experience stress and, eventually, burnout.

Today’s intense, competitive business climate has created corporate cultures that demand more and more from professionals.  To get ahead, 60 to 70 hour work weeks appear to be the new standard.

Goal setting is also very important on the climb.  Why is mental imagery, or visualization, a key component of successful goal setting?

Visualization allows you to see yourself at some point in the future, while goals offer a road map to reach these visions.  There is nothing more rewarding than having visions, setting goals, launching into action and persisting until you reach your destination.  The key to goal setting is your ability to turn this vision into reality.

Mental imagery is essential to goal setting.  Your ability to see yourself at the point of goal actualization is a key component to successful goal setting.  Goal setting breaks down unless you have great clarity about your vision.

“The last few steps of the climb will be the toughest, yet the most rewarding. They will require mental toughness, commitment, drive, self-discipline, positive attitude, and positive self-image.  It is when you make your final ascent that you will discover your inner strengths.” –F Scott Addis

Why is a positive first impression so important?  What are some tips you can offer our listeners or readers on creating a positive first impression?