7 Customer Service Strategies for an Amazing Customer Experience

It’s Customer Service Week making it an ideal time to review your customer service strategy.

Not too long ago, I had the opportunity to talk with one of the world’s authorities on the customer experience.  Shep Hyken is an author, speaker, and consultant to some of the world’s largest companies.  He is a member of the National Speakers Association’s Speaker Hall of Fame for lifetime achievement and is a member of the distinguished Speaker’s Roundtable.  His books include The Loyal Customer, Moments of Magic, and the bestselling books The Cult of the Customer and his latest The Amazement Revolution.

In The Amazement Revolution, Shep outlines seven powerful strategies to increase customer and employee loyalty.  As Shep says, the Amazement Revolution is, “The strategic decision to remake your organization or your team based on the principle of amazement.”

It seems simple, but it’s profound.  What if you and your organization really remade everything in your company around creating an AMAZING customer experience?  What would happen?

Customer Service Week

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89%

That’s the number of consumers who switched to a competitor after a bad experience.

86%

That’s the number of consumers who will pay more for exceptional customer service.

These statistics from Harris Interactive emphasize with numbers what we all know:  customer service matters.  We are more likely to stay with a company, to recommend a product, or to buy more services from companies who do it well.  And, when we have a negative experience, social media can become an outlet for frustration.

I’m a believer that everyone in a company is in customer service.  Decades ago, Peter Drucker said, “There is only one valid definition of business purpose: to create a customer.”  Servicing the customer is central to success.

Harvard’s Cynthia Montgomery Asks: Are You A Strategist?

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Cynthia Montgomery’s new book, The Strategist, will challenge you to rethink your approach to business strategy.  For over twenty years Professor Montgomery has taught at Harvard Business School.  For six of those years she led the strategy track at Harvard Business School’s executive program for owner-managers, personally helping business leaders around the world with strategy formation.  Her experience is that rare blend of the academic with the practical, and her new book offers business leaders the benefit of her extensive experience.

Every year, I read numerous business books and can say that this is one that won’t be relegated to a shelf.  It’s a blueprint, a guide to leading your company with greater success.  Nothing is spared, and you will question not only your company strategy but also your personal leadership of the strategic process.  See if you can answer with clarity the following questions:

Are you a strategist?

Why does your company matter?

Are you the leader your business needs?

Is your strategy filled with generic statements and empty clichés?

Do you know where your company is going and why?

After reading the book, I was personally challenged to rethink strategy.  I recently had the opportunity to ask Cynthia about her work and her vast experience in strategy formulation and leadership.

CEO Joel Manby on How Leading a Company With Love Works

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Lead With Love

Joel Manby is the incoming CEO of SeaWorld and the former CEO of Herschend Family Entertainment.  Herschend is the largest family owned theme park in the US owing 26 locations including Dollywood and Stone Mountain.  If he looks familiar, you may recognize him from his appearance on CBS’ Undercover Boss.

Joel’s is the author of Love Works: Seven Timeless Principles for Effective Leaders, a book about practicing love at work.  Talking about love at work may seem strange coming from a hard-charging executive who spent years in the automotive industry before joining Herschend.  After reading this book, I could tell that Joel meant every word of it.  Still, I had to start with the question about love at work.

This is a business book, but the title and the theme are all about Love.  Joel, you were an executive at GM, Saturn and Saab.  It’s all about metrics.  Numbers.  Results.  But, you say no, Love Works.  Tell me more about your transition from hard-hitting analytical executive to someone who sees love as a business success factor.

It’s still about metrics; the key question is which metrics? At HFE we measure all the standard business metrics including financial results, customer scores and employee scores. We all have to hit those numbers. In addition, we are also measured on HOW we go about hitting those numbers. We are all evaluated on the seven words outlined in Love Works. In fact, the top raises are given to those who hit both measurements; and all senior leaders are expected to be good at all of the above.

 

“Stick to your values in all circumstances.” –Joel Manby

 

 

Success Defined By Love

How do you define personal success?  Corporate success?

I define personal success as being consistent to my own personal mission statement:  to love God and love others. I can achieve that in a number of personal endeavors; but feel blessed to be able to achieve it in a growing, profitable business. Corporate success should be defined the same way:  ultimately, what is the mission statement of the company? Ours is to “create memories worth repeating.”

Do You Make These Résumé Mistakes? 17 Résumé Don’ts from the CEO’s Desk

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  1. Don’t use a functional (non-chronological) résumé format.  You’re not fooling me with that.  Don’t make me work to figure out what you’re hiding. Even if you get far into the hiring process in a non-traditional way, most companies will still want a traditional résumé at some point.
  2. Don’t ignore metrics and quantifiable data.  Businesses exist to move the needle.  Explain in numbers what you personally did to help your organization improve.  Did you save the company a million dollars?  Did you improve sales beyond your targets by 23%?  Did you renegotiate a major contract increase by 29%?  Did you improve customer retention by 5%?  The language of business is numbers.
  3. Don’t send résumés to the CEO if you’re applying for positions deep in the organization.  Try Human Resources.  Try the hiring manager.  Maybe try the department leader.  Sending it to me doesn’t help.  Do you think I read a résumé from someone I don’t know and immediately drop everything to make a phone call on your behalf?