A Conversation With Neil Abramson

Friend and publisher Rolf Zetterson had breakfast with me a few months ago, and told me about a great new book called Unsaid by Neil Abramson. What a captivating story and beautifully written debut novel. It’s been a favorite pick of independent booksellers and received praise from many publications and authors. All of Neil’s biographical information is important when you read the book.  Neil is an attorney in Manhattan who is married to a veterinarian.  Not only does he own 29 animals, but he works on behalf of animals.  He has served as a board member of the Animal Legal Defense Fund and was a founding member of the New York City Bar Association Committee on Legal Issues relating to Animals.

Notes on Creativity and Success from Diana Gabaldon

Diana Gabaldon is the bestselling author of the Outlander series and the Lord John novels. (Outlander fans, she is currently working on the eighth of the series Written in My Own Heart’s Blood. The latest Lord John novel was recently released.) She is a fascinating person with a diverse background.  I’ve known Diana for a few years and, when I visited Scottsdale, I interviewed her about her insights on her successful writing career. I quickly realized that some of her suggestions are applicable not just for authors, but also for all of us.  Here are a few success tips that I gleaned from Diana Gabaldon:

My Visit to Lakewood Church

Photo courtesy of Lakewood Church

Joel Osteen is the Senior Pastor of Houston’s Lakewood Church, the largest church in the U.S.  He’s immediately recognizable from his television ministry, bestselling books and stadium appearances.

Pastor Osteen has a consistent message of encouragement and hope.  That inspirational message resonates with the members of his home church and also with the millions who tune in to his weekly broadcast.

Wagging the Tail

Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/toddtaulman

Seth Godin recently wrote a post in response to my Huffington Post interview on the Future of the Book.  In it, he claimed that the long tail has hit the book business hard, and e-books will exceed a million new titles in 2012.  Because of this, all of the ideas I discuss (which he calls “breathtaking visions of the future” like embedded video and audio, plot twists, or alternative endings) he characterizes as “economically ridiculous.”  The reason is because the explosion of titles will force production costs down and, therefore, there will be no room for any enhancements for the book.