7 Attributes of a Great Business Leader

This is a guest post by Garret Norris. Garret is the founder and CEO of Business Coaches Sydney where he helps businesses succeed through disciplined management, creative marketing and committed client service.

A business organization has a lot of interactions with its environment, including the labor force, customers, regulators, and local communities. Business leadership is the primary factor that makes everything work seamlessly; without business leaders, all other business resources will not be maximized.

Forward-thinking business leaders are aware of the concerns of their employees and are updated with the new developments in leadership and management theory which enables them to create more efficient working environments.

As the adage goes, “No two leaders are the same.” Thus, every organization is being led by business leaders who their unique leadership style and preferences. Some are more comfortable dictating to their employees, while other prefer a more collaborative approach. The latter often tap into the creativity of their workforce, while the former usually delegate most tasks to their subordinates and will spend time and money to give to their employees the tools necessary to excel in their positions.

Regardless of the leadership styles, almost all business leaders share common traits that make them capable of the job. To learn the seven attributes of great business leaders, check this infographic from Business Coaches Sydney.

38 Inspirational Quotes from Billy Graham

Billy Graham once said, “I look forward to death with great anticipation” and “My home is in heaven. I’m just traveling through this world.”  Today we say goodbye to the great evangelist who is now home.

Some amazing facts about Billy Graham:

  • He was one of the ten most admired men in the world, appearing on the list more than anyone.
  • He preached to more people in live audiences than anyone else in history.
  • He was known as a spiritual adviser to presidents since Harry Truman
  • He was frequently called the Protestant Pope.
  • He has awards ranging from the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation Freedom Award to the Congressional Gold Medal.
  • He was bestowed with the Honorary Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire.
  • He was truly one of the giants of the last century.

Despite all of the accolades, he was puzzled by his own success, often saying “that the first thing I am going to do when I get to Heaven is to ask, “Why me, Lord?”

In his own words:

 

“A real Christian is the one who can give his pet parrot to the town gossip.” -Billy Graham

 

“Hot heads and cold hearts never solved anything.” -Billy Graham

 

“God has given us two hands–one to receive with and the other to give with.” -Billy Graham

 

“Courage is contagious. When a brave man takes a stand, the spines of others are stiffened.” -Billy Graham

2 Core Motivators That Impact Our Decisions

2 Core Motivators

You walk into class and take your seat in a large lecture hall. It’s only the second week of law school and your senses remain on heightened alert. You’ve been warned about this particular class. The professor is known as tough. He sees his role as weeding out the students who are smart but cannot make it in the courtroom. Fail his class and you’re out.

Perhaps even more importantly, he runs the class like a courtroom. He will question you as if you were an attorney fighting for your client’s life. You watched what he did to one student in the last class, reducing the student to an emotional mess.

You’re determined not to show weakness. You’ve prepared and studied like never before.

That’s the way I felt during my first year of law school. Some level of fear, I learned, may have its place as a self-motivator. No one wanted to walk into class and look foolish and unprepared. More than pursuing a good grade, it was the fear of public humiliation that drove most students to study and prepare for class.

Whether you want to motivate yourself or others, there are motivators at the core of every action. Knowing what is driving you and others is critically important.

Recently, I saw Greg McEvilly’s talk on motivation. Greg suggests that fear and love are the twin drivers of most actions. Greg is the CEO of KAMMOK, a company that sells outdoor equipment specializing in hammocks. In graduate school, he began to ask questions about motivation and behavior. Why is it that people behave the way they do? Even more important, Greg studied his own actions and thought about the definition of the words love and fear.

 

Love versus Fear

Greg’s definitions:

 

“Love is being other centered with little to no regard for self.” – Greg McEvilly

 

“Fear is being self-centered with little to no regard for others.” –Greg McEvilly

Lead with Courage

Courage Way

Lead with Courage

 

Leaders must regularly reach inside and draw courage to accomplish difficult goals. Leadership is a daily practice to become your best self and help others along the way.

So explains Shelly Francis in her new book, The Courage Way: Leading and Living with Integrity . Shelly has plenty of experience in her methods having served as the marketing and communications director at the Center for Courage & Renewal since 2012. The Center has over 5,000 participants in their programs each year.

I recently asked Shelly to share her views on courage and leadership.

 

“People attain worth and dignity by the multitude of decisions they make from day to day. These decisions take courage.” -Rollo May

 

5 Types of Courage

You talk about different types of courage. Why is courage at work so vitally important?

The five types of courage I describe include physical, moral, social, creative, and collective courage. The first four were named by psychologist Rollo May in his 1974 book, The Courage to Create. Even without more detail, I bet you can begin to imagine a workplace situation calling for each type of courage.

So many hours of our days are spent in the workplace—and we want those hours to matter, and we want to find meaning and purpose in our work. That trend manifests itself in each of the types of courage described in the book.

It takes physical courage to set healthy boundaries and practices for sustaining your energy rather than succumbing to burnout and overwork. In doing so, though, you risk being seen as weak or uncommitted.

It takes moral courage to speak truth to power, like we’re seeing with people sharing their stories of sexual abuse and harassment in the workplace, or reporting unfair business practices. But again, you risk losing your job, your privacy, retaliation, and so on.

It takes social courage to show up with your whole self, to risk sharing your best ideas, to risk being wrong, to be vulnerable and honest about acknowledging your limitations, or to risk asking for help (like you did in a recent blog, Skip).

It takes courage to be innovative in the commonly used sense of “creative,” the courage to risk and fail and try again. But what about the courage to create a culture where people can truly flourish? Yet again, to go against the status quo and try new ways of “being and doing” at work can be risky.

Collective courage is what we need most—people working together with integrity, commitment, and a capacity to cross lines of difference. Without such courage, we risk complex, volatile issues getting even worse. We risk missing a chance to make things better.

 

“Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.” -Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

5 Ingredients of the Courage Way

Unshackle from the Past to Move Your Company Forward

velocity
This is a guest post by Jack Bergstrand. Jack is the author of The Velocity Advantage, on the board of the Drucker Institute, and the leading expert on improving the velocity of cross-functional business transformation initiatives.

 

Move Your Company Forward

We compete in a world that is very fluid, as fluid as knowledge itself. Our work is ever changing and often ambiguous, yet we continue to manage like we did during the Industrial Revolution—with highly detailed and preplanned work, managers who try to do the thinking for the workers, and strong functional and organizational silos. Our work has changed, but how it is managed has not adapted. We simply use more advanced and expensive tools, too often doing excellently what shouldn’t be done at all. Scientific management, which was designed for factories, lives on because it is the devil we know. Even though we live in a world of constant change, companies continue to cling to practices that were designed for the predictable and repeatable nature of assembly lines and blue-collar work processes.

 

“Even though we live in a world of constant change, companies continue to cling to past practices.”

 

The nature of today’s organizations is very different from factories. With physical work, people who are carpenters and assembly-line workers work hard for a living. When they finish the day, it is visibly clear to them and to others what they have accomplished. In modern companies, people who are researchers, subject-matter experts, analysts, and managers also work hard for a living. Yet at the end of each day, their achievements are not always as clear. People can work on something that was urgent in the morning but is no longer important by dinnertime. With physical work, we can visibly see the waste that comes from not working (or from working on the wrong things). When people work with their knowledge, this waste is often invisible. It is costly nonetheless.

Working with knowledge can be extremely productive because an idea can be used and kept at the same time. It is unproductive, however, to manage it using approaches that were designed for industrial work. Knowledge is different in that it is invisible; it happens inside our heads. Activities often expand to fill the time available, resources tend to calcify around previous priorities through historically based budgets, and workers too often rise to their levels of incompetence. Similar to the old advertising adage, half a company’s knowledge is wasted—we just don’t know which half.