Would Your Client Write You a Check After Your Sales Presentation?

Signing a Check
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Would your prospect write a check for your sales call?

Read that title again.

What?

You’re thinking you want the sale.  You don’t expect to get a check for the call.  You’re lucky to have gotten the appointment.

Neil Rackham is the author of many books like Spin Selling, Rethinking the Sales Force and a number of other books.  Years ago, when I was a new sales executive, Neil spoke at one of our meetings.  After his presentation, he met with a small group of us.  Most of the discussion I’ve long forgotten, but I’ve never forgotten this question.

Bring Incredible Value

He asked:

“Is your sales call so valuable that your client would write a check for your visit?”

He obviously wasn’t suggesting we collect checks after every client meeting.  But he was saying that we should bring value to the call.  More value than a sales pitch.  We should do our homework and be able to offer solutions to the client beyond simply closing a deal.

I’ve never forgotten the advice.

“Is your sales call so valuable that your client would write a check for your visit?” -Neil Rackham

If you are preparing for a sales presentation, think about your client’s needs.  Think about the business.  Prepare not just for a sales call but as if you were a consultant coming in to help.

Increase Your Value

What I’ve learned is that if you prepare that way, you will move from:

Sales person to consultant

Consultant to adviser

Adviser to trusted confidante

Trusted confidante to friend

And here’s something else I’ve learned along the way:  It works far beyond a sales presentation.  In all aspects of what you do, are you so valuable that someone would write you a check?  Because when you are adding extraordinary value, you will become indispensable.

Have you ever prepared for a presentation in this way? Have you seen someone else do this? Where can you add extraordinary value today? You can leave a comment by clicking here.
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