The 3 Most Limiting Words

Young Woman Behind The Bars

 

“That’s just me.”

She said it definitively in that way people dismiss a question.  Tossing her hair with a quick flip, she signaled to the small group that there would be no discussion.

I’m not much of an eavesdropper.  I normally am absorbed in my own work.  But I was sitting in this little café only a few feet away.

I think it was her manager who sat down at the table, motioning to her to sit down.  The discussion was about customer complaints and her abrupt communication style.  Customers felt that she was dismissive and perhaps slightly arrogant.  At the same time, she received high marks for her product knowledge.

“That’s just me,” she said again, before flatly adding, “I get frustrated and impatient.  But I do know what to do.”

That’s Just Me.

For a moment, I bought it.  After all, you can’t really fight it if that is really who you are.

But then I stopped myself as I thought about those words.

Instead of thinking about ways to grow, she had unknowingly slammed the door shut, imprisoning herself in a world much smaller than only a few moments ago.

One of the greatest attributes of people is the ability to grow, to change, to develop.  Who I was five years ago is not who I am today.  That incredible quality, the ability to change who we are defies those three words.

 

Only you have the power to determine whether your future mimics your past. -Skip Prichard

7 Characteristics Leaders Share With Peeps

Easter Egg Hunt

For Christians, Easter is the holiday celebrating the resurrection of Jesus Christ.  But for Christians and non-Christians alike, Easter is the time of year when Peeps® appear in stores.  Peeps® are the line of marshmallow candies that seem to multiply with each passing week, eventually appearing in Easter baskets.

Leaders and Peeps:

1.  Stand the test of time.

Peeps were already in production when candy manufacturer Just Born purchased them from the Rodda Candy Company in 1953.  In the decades since, peeps have continued to be popular.

Leaders do not follow fads. Good leadership is enduring.

 

“Leaders do not follow fads.” -Skip Prichard

 

2.  Have a following.

Over 5.5 million peeps are made every day. In one year, the company makes enough peeps to circle the earth twice!  Peeps have fans all over the globe.

Leaders have followers.  That’s why we call them leaders!  Leaders learn to produce day in and day out, constantly delivering results.

 

“Leaders have followers. That’s why we call them leaders!” -Skip Prichard

 

3.  Improve with time.

Originally, Peeps were manufactured by hand when someone squeezed the mixture.  What once took almost 27 hours now takes less than six minutes.

Leaders consistently look for ways to improve. Leaders drive for efficiency and excellence.

 

“Leaders consistently look for ways to improve.” -Skip Prichard

 

4.  Are resilient.

Peeps are so resilient that two Emory researchers studied them, subjecting them to various experiments including water, sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide.  Peeps are almost indestructible.

Leaders are resilient.  They realize that failure is only a stepping-stone to success.  Leaders use failure as a fuel to propel future success.

51 Days : No Excuses

 

A few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to attend the Arnold Sports Festival here in Columbus, OH.  Previously named the Arnold Classic, the event is home to one of bodybuilding’s biggest competitions.

I had the privilege of talking with the very first Arnold Classic winner, Rich Gaspari.  Rich has won numerous bodybuilding awards including the Classic, Mr. America, Mr. Universe, and three time runner up Mr. Olympia.  He is also the CEO of a multi-million dollar supplement company, Gaspari Nutriton.

 

“Make sure your words are planting seeds of success and greatness in your life.” Rich Gaspari

 

No Excuses

9781939447135Rich recently wrote a book, 51 Days: No Excuses.  As you may expect, it is complete with a diet and exercise program designed to transform your body.  But it is much more than a book about the physical body.  It is full of stories about overcoming obstacles and staying motivated.

Rich’s personal story is compelling as he overcame numerous obstacles to win competitions and then overcame different obstacles to form a success business.

‘He that is good for making excuses is seldom good for anything else.’ –Ben Franklin

Turning Obstacles into Opportunities

His story is for you if:

  • You have ever been told, “You can’t do that.”
  • You are looking to change yourself in 51 days.
  • You have experienced rock bottom.
  • You have felt disgust, anger or frustration.
  • You have a dream and need a shot in the arm.

RichGaspari&Skip1

 

‘No one ever excused his way to success.’ Dave Del Dotto

 

Success Begins on the Inside

One of my favorite quotes from his book:

“I still believe one of the most important choices is how we treat others. What good does it do you to build a huge muscular, impressive body if you are small and underdeveloped on the inside?  I’ve always felt that success begins on the inside and reaching our true potential gets blocked when we are small-spirited.” –Rich Gaspari

 

‘Don’t make excuses and don’t talk about it. Do it.’ -Melvyn Douglas

 

“Do not make excuses whether it’s your fault or not.” -General Patton

 

“Difficulty is the excuse history never accepts.” Edward R. Murrow

 

“I attribute my success to this: I never gave nor took any excuse.” -Florence Nightingale

 

“Excuses are the nails used to build a house of failure.” Don Wilder

 

3 Toxic Habits That Will Cripple Your Productivity

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Thai Nguyen is a professional chef, international athlete, writer, and speaker. Listen to him share his personal journey. He is passionate about sparking personal revolutions in others. He blogs about breaking free from the mundane at wantrepreneurjourney.

More often than not, productivity is synonymous with success. The more quality content you are able to produce, the higher your conversion rate will be. Even talent is no match for productivity. The ever-entertaining Will Smith, with his numerous successes covering television, music, and cinema, was quick to respond when asked what his key to success was:

“I’ve never really viewed myself as talented, where I excel is ridiculous, sickening work ethic. When the other guy is sleeping, I’m working. When the other guy is eating, I’m working.”

It is a sentiment echoed by many great figures: If you just keep showing up and doing the work, results will come. When considering what stands against being productive, the usual suspects are procrastination, distraction, lack of self-discipline, and lack of willpower. However, there are three toxic habits that eat these culprits for breakfast:

1. Perfectionism

Striving to be perfect is not a bad thing. As long as you see perfection as the ideal and not the real. The reality is that everything can be improved. That is why you see new iPhones and iPads continually being churned out. That is why records are continually broken in every sport. Perfection is a unicorn that keeps running away.

 

Contentment is the enemy of improvement. -Thai Nguyen

 

Perfection cripples productivity when you spend far too much time working on the product rather than getting it out there. The inevitable question of, “What is the ideal amount of time?” is indeed a tricky one. The resolution is to be clear about your desired outcome as you are working on the project. What is it that you want your customers to experience once they are exposed to your product? If you are able to meet that level of expectation, then you have done your job. If you are able to exceed it, even better. But do not try to go beyond that and revolutionize the world. Not yet, anyway. That will happen when you least expect it.

2. Contentment

Being happy with your current state of being, your achievements and quality of relationships, is certainly a desirable goal—as long as it has a “best by” date on it. Contentment is the enemy of improvement. It is what keeps good from becoming great. You should always be seeking to set the bar higher and improving in all aspects of life. Snow is beautiful until you have to live with it daily.

 

Talent is no match for productivity. -Thai Nguyen

 

You are probably screaming, “What on earth is wrong with being happy with a situation?” That adage, “If it ain’t broke, why fix it?” may be ringing in your head right now. The reason contentment should only be a spring break is because change is inevitable. Everything is temporal. Change is the very fabric of the universe, and as much as you may strive to stay stationary, the tide will move you. We grow older, and we mature; technology continues to make groundbreaking changes; culture and society will ebb and flow. Thus, change and improvement, not contentment, goes hand in hand with personal development and productivity.

Failure Is Not Defeat

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This is a guest post by Tom Panaggio,
 Author of The Risk Advantage: Embracing the Entrepreneur’s Unexpected Edge. Tom is an entrepreneur who spends his time advising companies, speaking and spending time on the racetrack.

Vince Lombardi never admitted to failure. He always said that he never lost a game, he just ran out of time. To Lombardi, failure was not fatal; it did not mean that hope was lost. He simply refocused his team and made the necessary game strategy alterations. In his mind, he never lost or failed because he always made the necessary changes going forward.

There is a difference between failure and defeat. Failure is temporary, but defeat is permanent. I’d love to see the statistics for how many entrepreneurs mistook a failure as defeat and gave up. For anyone who accepts defeat, there is no hope, only regret.

 

Failure is temporary, but defeat is permanent. -Tom Panaggio

 

Today, I am an amateur race car driver. That obsession began in 1983 after I attended a sports car race at Daytona International Speedway. My background was in traditional athletics, and I knew nothing about racing or how to even begin to get involved. All I knew was that I wanted to do it. After conducting some research, I found that I needed to go to two accredited racing schools to qualify for a license, with the caveat that school number two must be a Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) sanctioned school. If I didn’t pass this second school, there would be no racing for me.

9781938416446The first school I attended, Skip Barber Racing School, supplied everything needed, including a real race car and all the safety equipment. The second SCCA school supplied only the racetrack and instructors; I needed to provide my own race car. By luck, I knew someone who owned a race car and was retired from driving. He was gracious enough to let me borrow his car if I paid to get it track ready. That turned out to be a mistake on his part.

I failed at the second racing school. Twice. In consecutive weekends, I failed due to mistakes. (Okay, I crashed both times.) The second failure caused the untimely death of the borrowed race car in a spectacular crash at over a hundred miles an hour. I can still see the track workers leaping from their protective bunker moments before I plowed into it.

Everyone told me to quit, to give up. They said that I didn’t have what it takes to be a race car driver. Even I had doubts, but my desire to race had not lessened. In fact, everyone else’s doubts made me want to prove that I could do it. I was determined, and I wouldn’t let failure defeat me.