3 Steps to Building Your Online Presence With Ron Edmondson

Ron Edmondson is quick to tell you that he is first and foremost a pastor.  And, while that is true, he also has a strong online presence that uniquely qualifies him to talk about social media.  His leadership blog is widely read, and he is active on Twitter and Facebook.

I met Ron online through Twitter, and we began discussing various leadership issues.  Just north of Nashville Ron started one of the fastest growing churches in the U.S.  He recently moved to Kentucky to lead another church.  Before he joined the ministry, Ron was a business owner.  His experiences running a small business, starting and rapidly growing organizations, and leading online were all topics I wanted to ask him in person.

In this nine-minute interview, we discuss:

  • The similarities and differences between leading a business and a church
  • How he has grown a church through the use of technology and social media
  • Why he was an early adopter of the Internet, Facebook, Twitter, and blogging
  • How he found his “blogging voice”
  • Mistakes he made along the way

I especially appreciated Ron’s advice to leaders who want to start building an online presence:

Lee Greenwood – Part Two

This post is part two of an interview I did with country music artist Lee Greenwood.  In this video interview, we talk about:

  • his humble beginnings
  • the importance of family
  • the uniqueness of the USA
  • the Massachusetts school controversy where the school leaders wanted to sing his signature song “God Bless the USA” as “We love the USA.”
  • the right and responsibility to vote
  • and finally I asked him to answer his own question: “Does God still bless the USA?”

On July 4th, after watching our local fireworks, we turned on the television and watched the fireworks in New York City.  The first song played in the background was “God Bless the USA.”

Lee Greenwood Asks: Does God Still Bless the USA?

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Even if you can’t recite the first verse, I’m certain that you know the chorus.

Read this and I’m sure your mind will start hearing the song.  Warning:  It may stay with you for the rest of the day.

Here are the first four lines of the chorus:

And I’m proud to be an American,

Where at least I know I’m free.

And I won’t forget the men who died,

Who gave that right to me.

In your head, isn’t it?

For those of us in the United States, it’s one of the most powerful, patriotic songs ever.  Whatever your background and whatever your political party, you likely are swept by the emotion of the song and its sentiment.

It was written years ago by Lee Greenwood.  He has since sung that song all over the world.  For Presidents.  In stadiums.  On a plane’s intercom flying over the World Trade Center site.  In dangerous situations around the world.

Because of What They Did, We are Blessed

In the United States, this is Memorial Day weekend.  We remember those who have served our nation who have paid the highest sacrifice.  We thank all of the veterans who have given of themselves to serve the country.

It’s also a time to reflect on our country.  Though we have challenges, we are still a blessed nation.

Local artist Beau Davidson is releasing his powerful new video “Blessed” this weekend.  When he shared it with me, I was so moved that I just had to share it with you.  Please take a few minutes this weekend and watch it and share it with others.

After watching the video, I had the following Q&A session with Beau.

Tell us about this video.  What inspired it?

Treat Me Like a Customer

One of my local Nashville friends, Louis Upkins, is someone who is filled with energy and ideas.  Whenever we get together, I am energized.  Louis has worked with some of the biggest names in business, sports, and entertainment. He wrote a thought-provoking book called Treat Me Like a Customer, which encourages business people to treat their families at least as well as their customers.  In a world that seems to be accelerating faster and faster, he has timeless advice on balance and lessons of success that really matter.

I spent some time with Louis talking about these principles and what he has learned from a life spent with fascinating people.