The Secret to Higher Profits in a Digitized World

people shock

The Decline of Customer Satisfaction

Customer satisfaction is going down, not up.

How can that be in a world with unprecedented technological progress?

 

“A brand is the sum of the good, the bad, and the off strategy.” –Scott Bedbury

 

Tema Frank founded Web Mystery Shoppers International, the world’s first company to test omnichannel customer service. Her new book, People Shock: The Path to Profits When Customers Rule , shows off both her decades of business experience and the research from interviewing over 150 business leaders. She developed a formula to help businesses improve the customer experience in the midst of a digitized world.

I recently asked her about her research.

 

“The key to getting work done on time is to stop wearing a watch.” –Ricard Semler

 

What is PeopleShock?

As we automate more and artificial intelligence wipes out jobs, the smaller amount that is left for human to human interaction becomes critical. Companies that are people-focused (while using technology to support those people) are the ones that will win in an era of increasing competition and social media power. If you get the people side right, PeopleShock is your key to success. Ignore it and your company will soon be history.

 

“If you’re too busy to build good systems, then you’ll always be too busy.” –Brian Logue

 

Get the 3Ps of Profit Right

Please share your 3P Profit Formula with our audience.

Customers are cranky, and they’ve got more choices than ever before. So you’ve got to keep them happy, and that means getting all of the 3 Ps of Profit right:

Promise – Having a clear aspirational, inspirational and memorable reason for doing what you do inspires staff and customers. It also gives staff a filter for decision-making: Would their action be consistent with the company’s promise?

People – Business success comes from connecting effectively at a human level with people inside (staff) and outside your organization. Outsiders include not only prospects and customers, but people we sometimes overlook, like suppliers, distributors, lenders, investors, media and the public.

Process – As time goes by, some of the processes that got you to where you are stop making sense.  To deliver consistently great customer experiences, you have to regularly re-assess how you’ve been doing things. Start by looking at processes from a customer point of view. What do they experience? Then look at how that lines up with what you do internally.

 

“CEOs are the ones who must conduct the corporate orchestra.” –Tema Frank

 

How does this translate into higher profits?

How to Provide Extraordinary Customer Service

Learn to Provide Extraordinary Service

What is it that makes customer service extraordinary?

This week is Customer Service Week, a week to remind organizations of the importance of customers and the week to especially celebrate those who provide this service day in and day out.

In honor of Customer Service Week, I want to share a conversation I had with an expert in the field of customer service, Mark Sanborn. Mark is an extraordinary professional speaker, the bestselling author of numerous books on customer service and leadership, and a personal friend. His many books have inspired me and countless others to raise our own performance and deliver exceptional service.

In this brief nine-minute conversation, we talk about:

  • What differentiates extraordinary customer service from average service
  • How good recovery means everything if you miss
  • How to use creativity instead of capital to fix customer service problems
  • The danger of indifference
  • Overcompensating for customer service misses
  • How leaders can develop a customer service culture throughout an organization

 

Customer Service Quotes from Mark Sanborn

Some of my favorite customer service quotes from this interview or from his books:

 

“Don’t sell products or services. Instead, create an experience for your customers.”–Mark Sanborn

 

“Go beyond simply satisfying the customer. Aim to astound.” –Mark Sanborn

 

“The customers who are willing to pay you the least will always demand the most.” –Mark Sanborn

101 Customer Service Quotes To Better Your Business

Very classy way to display the high standarts of your services the customer can expect of Yours.

Customer First

Every business wants to develop a stellar reputation. Over time, that positive sentiment not only earns repeat business, but also eventually earns trust. Customer service is vitally important to establish and grow that trust. Every interaction with you or your brand offers the incredible opportunity to build a relationship and fortify your position.

In the social media age, your business reputation can catapult you to a beloved partner or sink you to nothing in almost no time flat.

Here are a collection of customer service quotes all designed to remind us of the importance of the customer.

 

“Make the customer’s problem your problem.” –Shep Hyken

 

“If you want customers to know they matter to you, show it by being interested in what matters to them.” –Scott McKain

 

“There are no traffic jams on the extra mile.” –Zig Ziglar

 

“It is not the employer who pays the wages. Employers only handle the money. It is the customer who pays the wages.” –Henry Ford

 

“Do what you do so well that they will want to see it again and bring their friends.” –Walt Disney

 

“To understand the man, you must first walk a mile in his moccasins.” –North American Indian Proverb

 

“The purpose of a business is to create a customer who creates customers.” –Shiu Singh

 

“It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.” –Charles Darwin

 

“If you do build a great experience, customers tell each other about that. Word of mouth is very powerful.” –Jeff Bezos

 

“There is only one boss: the customer. And he can fire everybody in the company from the chairman on down, simply by spending his money somewhere else.” –Sam Walton

 

“The way to a customer’s heart is much more than a loyalty program. Making customer evangelists is about creating experiences worth talking about.” –Valeria Maltoni

 

“There is a spiritual aspect to our lives—when we give we receive—when a business does something good for somebody, that somebody feels good about them!” –Ben Cohen

 

“A brand is defined by the customer’s experience. The experience is delivered by the employees.” –Shep Hyken

 

“Unless you have 100% customer satisfaction, you must improve.” –Horst Schulz

 

“Complaints often contain the seeds for growth.” –Skip Prichard

 

“Choose to deliver amazing service to your customers. You’ll stand out because they don’t get it anywhere else.” –Kevin Stirtz

 

“People expect good service but few are willing to give it.” –Robert Gately


“It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about that, you’ll do things differently.” –Warren Buffett

 

“Good customer service costs less than bad customer service.” –Sally Gronow

 

“Here is a powerful yet simple rule. Always give people more than they expect to get.” –Nelson Boswell

 

“Spend a lot of time talking to customers face to face. You’d be amazed how many companies don’t listen to their customers.” –Ross Perot

 

“Always do more than is required of you.” –George Patton

 

“Customers will want to talk to you if they believe you can solve their problems.” –Jeffery Gitomer

 

“The result of a business is a satisfied customer.” –Peter Drucker

 

“The most successful organizations are the ones that make it easier to do business with them.” –Scott McKain

 

“Customer service represents the heart of a brand in the hearts of its customers.” –Kate Nasser

 

“What you get by achieving your goals is not as important as what you become by achieving your goals.” –Zig Ziglar

 

“Inconsistent customer service is worse than bad customer service.” –Martin Baird

 

“Courteous treatment will make a customer a walking advertisement.” –J.C. Penney

 

“When the customer comes first, the customer will last.” –Robert Half

How to Build A Customer Driven Growth Engine

Patron feminism; female customer care protection customer personalization individual customer CRM social customer service customer retention customer relationship care for employees marketing niche segmentation concepts.

Customer Culture

Not too long ago, I spoke with Jeanne Bliss about the 7 Inhibitors to Customer Driven Growth.  Jeanne’s new book Chief Customer Officer 2.0: How to Build Your Customer-Driven Growth Engine is a success roadmap for leaders wanting to build a customer-focused organization.

Jeanne also answered my questions about how to establish a customer culture, social media strategy, leadership, earning the right to grow, and establishing a sense of urgency:

 

Establishing a Customer Centric Culture

“Culture is the action, not the words.” How do you connect corporate aspirations with employees’ actions?

For customer-driven work to be transformative and stick, it must be more than a customer manifesto. Commitment to customer-driven growth is proven with action and choices. To engender this culture, people need examples. They need proof.

 

“Culture is the action, not the words.” -Jeanne Bliss

 

Customer culture is talked about by many leaders but misunderstood by most organizations. “Commitment” to customers must be attached to deliberate operational behavior, such as, “We will go to market only after these 12 customer requirements are met” or “Every launch must meet these five conditions, which the field requires for success. We won’t launch without them, no exceptions.”  People inside organizations need to see the commitment translated to actions that they will feel proud to follow and emulate.

Moving well past words, a deliberate and united set of leadership actions and behaviors practiced in unison is required.

One of the first activities we often undertake to unite leaders is to employ the journey framework to build an operational “code of conduct.”

 

codeofconduct (1)

 

7 Inhibitors to Customer Driven Growth

I made a mistake

7 Key Inhibitors

Jeanne Bliss is an expert on customer-centric leadership. Her new book Chief Customer Officer 2.0: How to Build Your Customer-Driven Growth Engine is a success roadmap for leaders wanting to build a customer-focused organization.  Jeanne pioneered the Chief Customer Officer position and has held the job for twenty years at Lands’ End, Allstate, Coldwell Banker, Mazda and Microsoft. She has led Customer Bliss since 2002 where she has consulted with some of the world’s largest companies.

With all of her experience and research, the very first thing I wanted to know was about the mistakes leaders are making.  She shared with me the 7 growth inhibitors companies are making again and again.

 

“Culture is the action, not the words.” -Jeanne Bliss

 

What mistakes are holding companies back from building a customer-driven organization?

 

Are You Making These Mistakes?

There are 7 key inhibitors that companies stumble over in trying to earn customer-driven growth:

1. Not having executives engaged in the effort.

Often executives will say that they want to focus on the customer experience, but they hand off the tasks to a department or area to work on it. It is hard to sustain this work without executive involvement driving the new prioritization, removing actions that are in the way, and giving people permission to work together.

2. Starting with a mantra, not an action plan.

Often companies decide that they want to get some early traction by telling everyone to “focus on customer experience.” What happens next is that people realize this is a big corporate priority and begin making plans, creating new scoreboards and taking action. A lot of action occurs, executives get a false-positive that change is occurring, but it eventually stalls out because the actions don’t add up to improve complete end-to-end customer experiences.

3. Not defining the customer experience and gaining alignment.

The most potent recurring use for the journey map is to guide work and discussions from the customer perspective. Without this framework to unite efforts, silo work continues to proliferate.

4. Not breaking the work into actionable pieces.