Leading From The Shadows

When I first became the CEO of a large global company, I could see how dependent I was on others.  My own efforts would be meaningless without many others supporting me.  The top job is often the one in the brightest spotlight, but that person’s success or failure is always the result of a team effort.  Usually a very small group—or even one individual—takes on the key supportive role.

Many people dream of becoming President or the leader of the organization.  Some people realize that they are best suited and happier in a supportive role or as number two.

 

“Success is best defined by yourself, not by others.” -Richard Hytner

 

When #2 is the Key to Success

 

Richard Hytner is deputy chairman of Saatchi & Saatchi, responsible for global strategy and innovation.  His recent book, Consiglieri: Leading from the Shadows, is a celebration of the No. 2 role.  This book made an impression on me because I am dependent on the “No. 2’s” and now better understand the role and the motivations.  I also feel better equipped to coach people who are either not looking for the “No. 1” role or are best suited for the supportive jobs.

Richard was kind enough to answer a few questions for me about his journey.

Richard, becoming No. 1, you argue, is not always the key to success.  Why not?

Success is best defined by yourself, not by others.  So, if becoming the No. 1 is really important to you, give it a go, see how happy it makes you feel and assess – candidly – how others respond to your leadership from a position of ultimate accountability.  You can, however, be enormously successful on your own terms leading from positions other than the overall No. 1, achieving great things and deriving deep personal satisfaction.  Get rid of the No. 1 and No. 2 in your head and simply weigh each job as an opportunity to test every leadership muscle, not only the one that makes the final decision.

image004Tell me about your personal journey.  When did you realize that being less than “No. 1” was where you would be happier and more successful?

I learned early in my career that leadership is a collective endeavor and, as a CEO, I always surrounded myself with the smartest possible people.  It was only when I took a year out, aged 43, to do the Sloan Fellowship program at London Business School that it dawned on me how many brilliant people there were enjoying significant accountability in roles other than the CEO.  Even though it took me a further three years as CEO of Saatchi & Saatchi EMEA to work out that I could and should try leading without the authority of a Chief Executive, it was at London Business School that I woke up or, rather, grew up.

 

“Develop a reputation for being a thinker and a doer, or you will run out of usefulness fast.” -Richard Hytner

 

Understanding Different Leadership Types

 

You define “A” leaders as accountable for the enterprise and “C” leaders as the Consiglieri who counsel, support, and deliver for the A.  What are a few differences of what you term “A” and “C” leaders?  

Selling to the C-Suite

In a previous post, I shared my opinions on selling to the top of an organization and why it isn’t always the best route to success.

There are obviously times when selling to the top is not only smart, but it’s required. Recently, I was asked about how to approach busy professionals with an idea, product, or service. If you are selling to senior executives, here are a few guidelines that may prove helpful.

 

“Stop selling. Start helping.” –Zig Ziglar

Be prepared.

As a sales leader, knowing your own company and your product is a requirement.  Take it a step further.  You need to know our company, too. When someone obviously hasn’t so much as looked at the company’s Web site, he has already lost credibility.  Don’t flaunt your advanced preparation, but work in ways you think we will benefit from a relationship.

It applies on the phone, too.  I can’t tell you how many people who finally do get me on the line are not prepared.  If you’re ready for the gatekeeper, but not the person you’re targeting, here’s a hint:  Don’t make the call.  Do your homework.

 

“Timid salesmen have skinny kids.” –Zig Ziglar

 

Be clear.

Don’t launch into a stream of acronyms or nonsensical statements.  No, I’m not meeting with you for an hour to learn to “drive efficiencies throughout the organization, maximizing ROI and improving profits.”  Really.  We do that every day, and we know the business and you don’t.  So, be clear on what the benefit is to the organization.  Don’t use complex language designed to impress.

 

“Every sale has 5 basic obstacles: no need, no money, no hurry, no desire, no trust.” –Zig Ziglar

 

Be crisp.

We’re all busy.  Don’t drag it out.  Most executives are incredibly busy and bottom-line oriented.  If you catch my attention, then you will have more leeway and time to make your case.

How We Make Decisions

We are all rational beings, making decisions after carefully weighing the analytical arguments.  We always keep an open mind.  We study the facts, and then decide.  Logical, analytical, practical.  When confronting a big decision, our brain overpowers everything to help us arrive at the right conclusion.  We don’t let emotions get in the way.  Ever.

Right?

Well, it’s probably not like that for most of us.

Head Justifies the Heart

We actually tend to make emotional decisions first, and then look for facts to justify that decision.  That’s what the scientists say in recent studies.

Our “gut” helps us decide.  That’s emotion.  In other words, we decide in our heart and justify it in our head.

That’s not good or bad; it’s just the way it is.

As a result, marketers tend to pull at our “heart strings” with emotional appeals.  It’s why branding is so important—colors carefully chosen, music picked with care.  All of it is designed in an effort to sway our emotional decision-making.  We create a certain feeling through the use of sensual imagery.

Ironically, these marketing decisions are not based on what marketers “feel” would work.  Many of them are based on neuroscience.  Expose a group of consumers to a product while giving them a brain scan.  That shows what areas of the brain are lighting up.  There are other tools that are used—blood pressure, skin tests, eye tracking, and all sorts of biofeedback mechanisms.  The results help marketers see what works literally by seeing inside our brains.

An Exciting Leadership Challenge

This last year, I have had the privilege of exploring many opportunities and consulting with different organizations.  I’ve enjoyed the chance to study various teams and learn from a variety of leaders.  At the same time, I most enjoy operational roles where I’m responsible for driving results.

In June, I will be joining OCLC as President-elect and I will be named President & CEO on July 1.  Based in Dublin, Ohio, OCLC is a nonprofit computer library service and research organization.  Its goals include furthering access to the world’s information and reducing library costs.

During major career changes, I make a list of what I am looking for and then evaluate various opportunities against these criteria.  Here are a few I’d like to share with you in case it helps you on your own journey:

Supportive.  If you are joining a company, it is important to know whether you will have support or whether you will be fighting internally.  Most of us have experienced teams where everyone is more concerned about survival than about helping each other.  Specifically on my list is a “supportive board of directors.”  I met with the trustees numerous times throughout the process and this is one of the most engaged, thoughtful and supportive boards I have ever seen.

Engaging.  Really what this one is about is that I don’t like to be bored.  For me, I enjoy industries in transition or undergoing change.  Libraries have been at the cutting edge of technology for years and face challenges due to budget constraints.  I’m excited to help in any way possible and know that the variety of technological and economic changes will provide new challenges.

Stable.  I’ve enjoyed working in many different environments.  Working in a stable business is important to me.  My predecessor at OCLC, Jay Jordan, has done an excellent job working with the members to expand into new areas around the globe.  Note: It’s possible to be both stable and in the middle of rapid change at the same time.

Respected.  I’ve worked with libraries my entire career.  OCLC is one of the most respected names anywhere, and this is because the member libraries help to make it what it is.  The combination of fully engaged member libraries with talented OCLC employees around the world makes for a dynamic, well-respected organization.

Note to Managers: Stop Making Decisions

This is a guest post by Dennis Bakke. Dennis is the CEO of Imagine Schools and the author of The Decision Maker: Unlock the Potential of Everyone in Your Organization, One Decision at a Time (Pear Press)..

The conventional wisdom on leadership: Get advice from others but make the final decision. But in today’s shifting global marketplace, it’s out of date. More and more, success in business isn’t about producing the proverbial widget, but unlocking human potential. Success isn’t about rigid systems that guide our people as they churn out product. It’s about how we release our people to innovate, at every stage of the game.

As a young leader, I followed the conventional wisdom. I might ask a couple of people for some input before I made a decision. But I made the final call, always.

Success is about how we release people to innovate, at every stage of the game. -Dennis Bakke

It didn’t take me long to realize that the more decisions I made, the less engaged others became.  They didn’t have any control over the process or the results. So they didn’t feel any ownership in them either.

The problem was me. To be a good leader, I had to let go.

The reality is that it is the boss who is often the last to know. So when bosses, department leaders or team leaders make all the decisions, they’re often operating with stale or second-hand information, some of which has been edited or sanitized on its way to “the boss.”