12 Intentional Behaviors That Lead to Big Impact

Small acts of leadership


What’s different about the most remarkable leaders?

How can I have a bigger impact?


How Small Acts Can Equal Big Impact

Author and serial entrepreneur G. Shawn Hunter is the founder of Mindscaling. His latest book, Small Acts of Leadership: 12 Intentional Behaviors That Lead to Big Impact, argues that it’s the simple things, when done extraordinarily well, that make a great leader.

Shawn and I talked about his book and how it’s not always the most extraordinary, sweeping actions that make the biggest impact.


“The greatest leaders cheer us on when we try something new.” -Shawn Hunter


I love this philosophy because all of us can make just a few adjustments and improve our leadership today.


Do One Thing At A Time

G. Shawn HunterYou advocate that small, incremental choices can lead to a big impact. In your research for this book, what one small choice have you noticed in the most successful leaders?

I would say the one thing that successful people do is that they do one thing at a time. That might sound small and trifling, but, honestly, the way successful people get things done, or have meaningful conversations, is to do only that one thing. They turn off their phone when talking to people. They turn off email. They schedule time for writing and reading. They block off time for exercise and reflection. It sounds small, but it adds up.


Successful people do one thing at a time.


Is it possible to teach self-confidence? What are some ways to increase it?

The biggest contributor to building self-confidence is building competence. Nothing makes you feel confident like being prepared. There is also a type of self-questioning that can be quite helpful. Instead of repeating the mantra, “Yes, I can do this!” to build self-confidence, try asking yourself if you have the capabilities to achieve what you are envisioning. If you ask specific questions of yourself, you will be forced to answer to your weaknesses and reconcile them.


“The biggest contributor to building self-confidence is building competence.” -Shawn Hunter


Build Your Resilience

You talk about building resilience through challenge. Do challenges make the leader, or does the leader seek out challenges?

From what I understand through studying flow states, it’s a self-reinforcing paradigm, but only if you get the challenge part right. As your readers may know, flow states occur when the level of challenge presented meets (or slightly exceeds) your skill level. In that state we can become hyper-aware and hyper-focused. We also accelerate our learning. Once we feel that state, we often seek out those experiences which create flow states. There are people who can actually get addicted to inducing this type of state. They’re called Type T people, also known as adrenaline junkies.


Pronoia: believing the world is conspiring for your success.


Develop Persistent Curiosity

Persistence. I love the story of your daughter and how she ended up with a rare poster of Taylor Swift. What are some ways to develop persistent curiosity in everything we do?SmallActs-front (1)

Good question! The great physicist Richard Feynman once described how you can spot a real expert versus a phony. Look for three little words, “I don’t know.” The phony will have all the answers, while the experts will be willing to admit what they don’t know. Real experts are relentlessly curious, even assertively curious – that is, they will demand explanations for things that many others simply accept as rules.

Here’s an interesting fact about people who describe themselves as curious. These people are also assertive. Curious people are decision-makers. They are influencers. They often say they have direct influence over the outcome of decisions and change. If you think of the people in your company and community who consistently drive change, I bet you will be thinking of inquisitive people – people willing to ask the hard questions.


“Creating confidence is the result of applied effort and work.” -Shawn Hunter


Take a Break (even if you’re busy!)

You advocate the counterintuitive advice of taking breaks when we’re busy. Why is taking a break so important? How do you get a type-A, driven leader to follow this practice?

All-nighters don’t scale. Period. In some corners of business, we have created a work environment in which it’s cool to brag about how many hours we work, and how little sleep we get, and how many deliverables we accomplish. I worked in a company once that mandated a rapid response time to every incoming message. When you create an environment which requires people to constantly monitor correspondence over email and text, the next thing they do is constantly initiate messages.

Studies demonstrate what we already know intuitively. That is, our intellectual and productivity capacity diminishes rapidly when we are sleep deprived and when we are distracted. To answer your question, organizations and leaders should reward people who deliver meaningful, thoughtful contributions, not who puts out the highest volume of email noise.

12 Intentional Behaviors for Big Impact

1: Believe in yourself.

2: Build confidence.

3: Introduce challenge.

4: Express gratitude.

5: Fuel curiosity.

6: Grant autonomy.

7: Strive for authenticity.

8: Be fully present.

9: Inspire others.

10. Clarify roles.

11. Defy convention.

12. Take a break.

Defy Convention

Of the 12 critical competencies, is there one that more leaders struggle with than others?

How to Transform Promises into Results

The Agenda Mover

Be An Agenda Mover

It’s not enough to have an idea.

Ideas without action, without execution, without forward-momentum don’t matter. To make a difference, you need to have the skills to turn an idea into reality.

Leaders are people who turn ideas into something tangible, turning promises into results.


“If you cannot move your agenda, you’re not a leader.” –Samuel Bacharach


It’s a skill that anyone can learn. And Samuel B. Bacharach, the author of The Agenda Mover: When Your Good Idea Is Not Enough, is an expert in execution. He is also co-founder of the Bacharach Leadership Group, which focuses on training leaders in the skills of the Agenda Mover, and is the McKelvey-Grant Professor at Cornell University.

I recently had the opportunity to ask Sam about his newest book and turning ideas into reality.


Develop the Qualities of an Agenda Mover

Having a great idea is not enough. You teach a process for taking an idea into actionable reality. Before we go into your process, what leadership qualities are essential to being an effective agenda mover?

First and foremost, Agenda Movers keep their egos in check. They are aware that – no matter how good they think their idea is—there may be other perspectives out there. They understand that confidence is one thing, but they know ego can lead to delusion.

Second, Agenda Movers are deeply empathetic. I use that word in a very specific way, meaning that Agenda Movers are capable of standing in the shoes of other people and are capable of seeing the world from varied perspectives. They can see their agenda not only from their perspective but also from the perspective of others.

Third, Agenda Movers tactically focus. They are mindful of small details and tactics. They understand that charisma, bombastic ideas, and grand promises work only up to a point and that what is really needed to get things done are micro-behavioral skills.

Lastly, Agenda Movers understand that they can’t do it alone. To get anything done they need to have others in their corner. They understand the importance of coalitions, and they are able to adopt a coalition mindset.

If you look at the great Agenda Movers out there—these are the characteristics they all share.


“Agenda Movers understand what it takes to move things forward.” –Samuel Bacharach


Anticipate Motivations

The first step of your strategic blueprint is to anticipate others’ agendas and know where they’re coming from. I recall one person just totally missing it, oblivious to what seemed to be obvious signs. How do you help aspiring leaders to be more situationally aware of others and their motivations?

I think this is the number one mistake leaders make: They don’t spend enough time focusing on where others are coming from.

I remember years ago a student of mind was asking for advice on defending her dissertation in front of five faculty members I knew. The main advice I gave her was to stop focusing on her dissertation and instead to focus on the dissertations and research that the members of the committee had done. Simply put, I told her, “You know where you’re coming from. Make sure you know where they are coming from.”

Good Agenda Movers do their homework and I mean that literally. They dedicate time to figuring out there others stand, how they think, and what they want. They don’t presume they are born with situational awareness—they develop it and work on it.

Too often we look for shortcuts in trying to figure out the agendas of others. We think that if we understand their background or their personality, we can generalize their motivation and intention. This belief is both lazy and wrong. For most people, whether in organizations or in politics, motivation is determined by the specific agenda, not simply by personality.

An individual may be a staunch traditionalist on one issue and a complete revolutionary on another issue. Leaders who make quick summations about the agendas of others and don’t do their homework are bound to make mistakes.


“Leadership is about building a coalition that can turn an innovative idea into reality.” –Samuel Bacharach


How to Deal With Resistance

Gaining traction and initial support is crucial. If you’re met with resistance, what do you do?

First of all, resistance should never come as a surprise to anyone. All leaders, all organizational actors, will face resistance—it’s just a question of when and how much.

In our political and organizational systems, resistance is part and parcel of the checks and balances that improve what we’re trying to accomplish.

So for starters, don’t let resistance throw you for a loop. Don’t let it shock you. Don’t let it root you to the ground. Instead, you should expect it and have a plan to deal with it.

I argue in my book that there are only a handful of ways people can resist an idea. To the surprise of my students, this really isn’t a daunting challenge. There are a limited number of ways resistance can argue against any idea and leaders can easily defend against these arguments with a little preparation. Once you’re able to categorize the arguments of resistance, you will be able to apply your counter arguments of justification.


Leadership Tip: Know where you want to go and whose support you need to get there.


Know the 3 Types of Resistors

What’s the best way to deal with resistors?

The first thing you need to understand is what type of resistance you’re facing.

In my book I look at three main types of resistors in an organizational context: active resistors, passive resistors, and internal resistors.

While I always support leaders building a wide swath of support, they might have the hardest time convincing active resistors to join their coalition. At some point, an Agenda Mover should move on and not waste his or her time.

Good Agenda Movers focus on talking with passive resistors. They are those actors who aren’t actively undermining your efforts, but certainly are not helping them, either. Since they are on the fence, so to speak, a leader can be clever and find ways to incorporate them into his or her coalition by presenting potential benefits to them.

Lastly, there are internal resistors—those who sneak into a coalition in a Trojan Horse. Agenda Movers can prevent them from showing up by monitoring their coalition and making sure they don’t let team traction and momentum slip after an initial surge.


“Ultimately, a genuine leader is not a searcher for consensus but a molder of consensus.” -Martin Luther King


How to Sustain Momentum

Once you get going, you need to sustain the momentum. How do you use small victories effectively? Why do some ideas die in this stage?

Some leaders are great at mobilizing political support for their agenda. They’re great at convincing people of the need for innovation and change. They’re great at getting others to join them. But they drop the ball once they mobilize support. It’s sort of like the politician who gets elected but doesn’t deliver.The Agenda Mover Book Jacket

These leaders stop doing their homework. They stop thinking about the team. They lose their focus and start looking toward the horizon for another big project or a big career move. As a result, they leave it to their coalition to work out the day-to-day details of implementing a new idea.

Agenda Movers can’t relax once they start building some traction. If anything, they need to work harder to drive momentum by not only celebrating small victories but also by providing the right resources and maintaining optimism. They have to supplement the prudent political competence they have used to gain support with a managerial capacity to make sure that things keep on moving. Like I said, it is one thing to gain support and it is another to deliver.


“People who produce good results feel good about themselves.” –Ken Blanchard


Is there one step in the agenda moving process where most leaders fail? 

10 Science-Backed Ways to Be Happier Right Now


Don’t Worry, Be Happy!

Happiness. Some people pursue it. Those who have it radiate with an inner joy.

There are various techniques to develop a more positive attitude, ways to train yourself to be content. The people I would describe as the happiest aren’t those with the most things, or even the most friends, but those who have a deep faith.


“Worry can rob you of happiness but kind words will cheer you up.” –Prov. 12:25


This infographic contains 10 science-backed ways to be happier. Do these techniques work for you? What would you say creates true happiness?


“Love is trembling happiness.” –Kahil Gibran



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“Learn to let go. That is the key to happiness.” –Buddha

“Happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony.” –Gandhi

“To fall in love with yourself is the first secret to happiness.” –Robert Morely

“Your words became the happiness in my heart.” –Jeremiah 15:16

Revolutionary Techniques to Become a Master of Persuasion


A Revolutionary Way to Influence

What separates effective communicators from truly successful persuaders?

Since I read hundreds of books each year, I am always talking about them. Some books are quickly forgotten and others stay with you. And then there are a few books that are so extraordinary that they merit a second read and deserve a prominent place on your closest shelf. Not to impress, but to be there when you need to refer to an idea or refresh your mind.


“Every battle is won before it is fought.” -Sun Tzu


The book I’m talking about in this post is in that rare category. The author, Dr. Robert Cialdini, is best known for his groundbreaking work, Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion, which is a perennial bestseller. It’s so good that it’s become part of our collective thinking. From social media to sales to leadership techniques, it’s a classic.

When I heard that Dr. Cialdini wrote a new book, Pre-Suasion: A Revolutionary Way to Influence and Persuade, I couldn’t wait to read it. And I’m certain it’s one you’ll want to read again and again.

I enjoyed the opportunity to ask him about his research and his new book.


“If you want to change the world, change the metaphor.” -Joseph Cambell


What High Achievers Do Differently

You spent time infiltrating the training programs of numerous companies. What was the biggest surprise for you during this time?

You’re right. As a kind of secret agent, I once infiltrated the training programs of a broad range of professions dedicated to getting us to say yes. In these programs, advanced trainees were often allowed to accompany and observe an old pro who was conducting business.  I always jumped at those opportunities because I wanted to see if I could register, not just what practitioners in general did to succeed, but what the best of them did.  One such practice quickly surfaced that shook my assumptions.  I’d expected that the aces of their professions would spend more time than the inferior performers developing the specifics of their requests—the clarity, logic, and desirable features of them.  That’s not what I found.


Research: high achievers spend more time than others preparing before making a request.


The highest achievers spent more time crafting what they did and said before making a request.  They set about their mission as skilled gardeners who know that even the finest seeds will not take root in poorly prepared ground.  Much more than their less effective colleagues, they didn’t rely merely on the merits of an offer to get it accepted; they recognized that the psychological frame in which an appeal is first placed can carry equal or even greater weight.  So, before sending their message, they arranged to make their audience sympathetic to it.


Surprising findings from Dr. Cialdini:

You are more likely to choose a French wine if you’ve just been exposed to French music.

You are more inclined to buy inexpensive furniture if the website wallpaper is covered in pennies.

You will likely be more careful if you just viewed a picture of Rodin’s The Thinker.

You are more likely to feel someone is warmer if they have just handed you hot chocolate.

You are more likely to purchase a popular item if you start to watch a scary movie.


How Seating Arrangements Influence Your Perception

Let’s talk about our point of view. Even the subtle change of seating arrangements or the view of the camera changes everything. What are some implications of this finding?

Imagine you are in a café enjoying a cup of coffee and, at the table directly in front of you, a man and woman are deciding which movie to see that evening.  After a few minutes they settle on one of the options and set off to the theater.  As they leave, you notice that one of your friends had been sitting at the table behind them.  Your friend sees you, joins you, and remarks on the couple’s movie conversation, saying, “It’s always just one person who drives the decision in those kinds of debates, isn’t it?”  You laugh and nod because you noticed that, although he was trying to be nice, it was clearly the man of the couple who determined the movie choice.   Your amusement disappears, though, when your friend continues, “She sounded sweet, but she just pushed until she got her way.”

Dr. Shelley Taylor, a social psychologist at UCLA, knows why you and your friend could have heard the same conversation but come to opposite judgments about who produced the end result.  It was a small accident of seating arrangements:  You were positioned to observe the exchange over the shoulder of the woman, making the man more visible and salient, while your friend had the reverse point of view.  Taylor and her colleagues conducted a series of experiments in which observers watched and listened to conversations that had been carefully scripted so neither discussion partner contributed more than the other.  Some observers watched from a perspective that allowed them to see the back of one or another discussant and the face of the second; other observers’ perspectives allowed them to see both faces equally (from the side).  All the observers were then asked to judge who had more influence in the discussion over its tone, content, and direction. The outcomes were always the same:  These ratings of responsibility corresponded with the visibility of the discussants’ faces. Whoever’s face was more visible was judged to be the more influential.

This means that, if we can get people to direct their visual attention to a person, product, or event, it will immediately seem more influential to them.  People believe that, if they’ve paid special attention to an item, it must be influential enough to warrant that attention.  But that’s not true because attention can be channeled to an item by factors unrelated to its significance, such as distinctive colors, which nonetheless increase observers’ estimation of the item’s significance.


Research: directing visual attention can influence perceptions.


Your What Depends on Your Where

I love the personal example you share about the geography of influence. When you wrote on campus, it was radically different than when you wrote at home. It immediately resonated with me, too, because I’ve seen styles change when writing at a courthouse, in a corporate office, or at home. Based on your research, to maximize effectiveness, what recommendations would you share?

When I began writing my first book for a general audience, I was on a leave of absence at a university other than my own.  Of course, I filled my campus office there with my professional books, journals, articles, and files. In town, I’d leased an apartment and would try to work on the book from a desk there, too.  But the environment around that desk was importantly different from that of my campus office–newspapers, magazines, tabletops, and television shows took the place of scientific publications, textbooks, filing cabinets, and conversations with colleagues.

Writing in those separate places produced an effect I didn’t anticipate and didn’t even notice:  The work I’d done at home was miles better than what I’d done at the university because it was decidedly more appropriate for the general audience I’d envisioned.  Surprised, I wondered how it could be that despite a clear grasp of my desired market, I couldn’t write for it properly while in my university office.  Only in retrospect was the answer obvious.  Anytime I lifted or turned my head, the sightlines from my on-campus desk brought me into contact with cues linked to an academic approach and its specialized vocabulary, grammar, and style of communication.


Research: what you say or do immediately before the appeal affects success.


It didn’t matter what I knew (somewhere in my head) about the traits and preferences of my intended readers.  There were few cues in that environment to spur me to think routinely and automatically of those individuals as I wrote.  From my desk at home, though, the cues were matched to the task.  There, I could harmonize with my audience much more successfully.  So here’s my recommendation for leaders:  When writing for any particular audience—clients, colleagues, employees—put a photo of a typical member of the audience in the corner of your computer screen as you write.  That photo will be an automatic, unconscious reminder of your audience and their communication styles, which will allow you to write in a way that is aligned with those styles.  I do that regularly now, and it works for me.


Writing Tip: put a photo of a typical audience member on the corner of your screen.


Relationships Determine the Result

9 Rules of Negotiating from the High Ground


9 Rules of Negotiating

After enlisting in the Marines Ken Marlin worked his way up to become a captain and infantry commander. After the Marines, Ken has led a technology company and finally an investment bank on Wall Street.

What I really appreciate about Ken is that he has taken his variety of experiences from the battlefield to the corporate boardroom and distilled his leadership principles in a way that can help all of us. His new book, The Marine Corps Way to Win on Wall Street: 11 Key Principles from Battlefield to Boardroom, is full of his candid advice on leadership.


“Prior preparation prevents poor performance.” –Ken Marlin


And I highly recommend the read.

There was one section of the book that focused on an aspect of leadership that I wanted to ask him more about. That was the section on negotiation, on deal-making, on getting to agreement.

I had the opportunity to ask Ken about his 9 rules of negotiations.


Negotiation Tip: negotiate big things before little things.


Be Ready to Walk

Be prepared to walk away from the table. This is a great place to start. Do you have an example of when someone wasn’t willing to walk away and how that hurt them?

I have many examples both positive and negative. That’s because negotiating is much more about psychology than logic – and it has very little to do with finance.  The negative examples aren’t fun to talk about.  But we have had clients who simply weren’t willing to walk away from a prospective deal. Inevitably the other side took advantage.  One that comes to mind resulted in a sale that I strongly advised against.  Our client was a seller.  The price offered seemed quite strong, on the surface.  It was significantly higher in total value than those we received from other bidders – but a significant portion of the price was to be paid over three years based on the company’s future earnings.  We’ve worked with so-called “earn-out” structures before and often they are fine.  But, in this particular case, I believed that the upfront portion of the purchase price was much too low and the protections for my client post-deal were too weak.  We pushed back of course, but the buyer touted the total value of the potential deal and was unwilling to move.  I advised my client to walk away and negotiate with one of the other bidders – leaving the door open for the first one to get more reasonable.  But my client was also focused on the total theoretical value and – perhaps – a bit too sure of himself and his own abilities.  He was not willing to negotiate hard – and take the risk of losing this deal.  He took the deal.  The results were predictable.  Within a year the senior management of my client’s company were out – and the sellers never received most of the earn-out.  There were lawsuits.  But the lawyers are about the only ones who came out ahead.


“Discipline is critical to proper preparation.” –Ken Marlin


There must be less depressing examples of the where the approach did work. 

Sure, there are lots.  For example, a few years ago, we had a VC-controlled client that had been negotiating the sale of their company for months with a very qualified buyer before they came to us for help.  The offer was all-cash at a fair price by any measure.  At the same time, it was clear that the buyer would merge the organizations and fire at least half of my client’s personnel.  The VCs were mostly interested in the money, but they were sympathetic to the CEO’s desire to protect his people.  The CEO had tried to negotiate, but the buyer said that their offer was “best and final” and would expire in 3 weeks.  Further, the buyer said that if there were any solicitation of other bidders, they would walk from the table.  The buyer was using their leverage better than my client. They assumed that the VCs would not risk losing a high all-cash offer.Ken Marlin Headshot

I told my client that they could not negotiate if the other side perceived that they were unwilling to walk from the table. Otherwise we would just be begging.  We knew that if we solicited other bids we might lose the first buyer, but that was a risk we had to take to improve the terms.  My client agreed to take the risk. Once we had other bids coming in and the first buyer saw that they might lose the deal, they materially improved the cash portion of their offer.  But they put even more emphasis on cost reductions.  Fortunately, we had identified another interested bidder, and we were able to use our leverage – including the specter of sale to the original buyer – to obtain an offer for more money and protections for the employees.  That was win-win.

About a year ago we had a similar experience internally, as the lease on our office space was expiring.  We were the sole occupant of the top floor of a prestigious New York office tower.  It had terraces, great light and views, and it was all built to our specifications.  We were willing to stay.  But the landlord asked for a rent increase that was clearly above market.  He may have assumed that we would not walk away.  We pushed back. We showed him that rent for comparable spaces was lower.  But logic did not work.  He declined to offer more than a pittance.  So we went out and found another great space and used the specter of staying in the original space as leverage to negotiate great terms with the new building.  When the first landlord saw that we were willing to walk from the table, he finally got reasonable.  But it was too late.  We moved to the new space.  We love it.


“Staying safely at your home port is narrow thinking.” –Ken Marlin


Tell the Truth

Tell the truth. I love this one as part of your rules. What’s the Marine definition of lying?

I’m not saying that you can’t lie to an enemy who is trying to kill you or your friends.  This is about negotiating in normal business environments – or in Marine environments when you are negotiating with so-called “friendlies” (such as local villagers).  In this context, the Marine definition of lying goes beyond the standard definition of asserting something as fact that you know to be otherwise.  It includes making statements – or failing to make statements – as part of an express intent to deceive. It’s an extension of the concept that my word is my bond – with a focus on being honest with those who expect that of you.  Reputations are built over time and will outlast the negotiations at hand.  A reputation as a liar will eventually catch up to you.


Negotiation Tip: don’t make promises that will be challenging to keep.


So in that context, how do you bluff in negotiating?  Doesn’t everyone bluff?

It’s true that, in my business, many people bluff.  And more than a few lie.  Lying is always bad.  Bluffing usually is.  It is also dangerous if your bluff is called.  It can cost the loss of major negotiating points – and sometimes kill the deal.  That’s why I prefer the truth.


“Discipline can help ensure successful execution.” –Ken Marlin


Understand Leverage

Recognize when you have leverage-and when you don’t. How do you know what the leverage each side has? How does this impact your deal making?

Ken Marlin holding a rifle at OCS Quantico VA @ 1972In the Marines, leverage comes from a combination of superior force combined with moral certainty.  Moral certainty was one of the key ingredients in how Americans won the Revolution against the superior forces of the British Empire.  It was key to winning World War II, and it was also key to the US losing the War in Vietnam.  Sure, there are many exceptions where superior force trumped all.  See the Russians in Chechnya.  But 150 years later, that war isn’t completely over yet.  In deal making, the best leverage comes from a combination of being on the moral high ground and being willing to walk from the table.  That leverage increases the more the other side wants to get the deal done.  It’s usually not hard to recognize.  In the book I relay a vignette about the CEO of a very large firm that had made an offer to acquire our client’s company.  After we shook hands on what appeared to be a very fair purchase price, he began to dictate deal terms – and even to change some that had previously been agreed. The CEO acted as if he had all the leverage, when actually, by his bullying tactics, he had squandered the moral high ground.  He was then left with the assumption that my client was desperate to complete the deal.  They weren’t that desperate.  The CEO was surprised when we walked from the table.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles.” –Sun Tzu


Remember the Peace

Remember the peace. Most non-military experts will pause on this one. What does it mean and why is it so important?

Most statesman learned long ago that after most wars end, there is wisdom in finding a way for the formerly warring parties to live with each other.  After the Civil War came what was supposed to be reconstruction.  After WWII came the Marshall plan.  When people forget that basic rule of remembering the peace, it can be bad.  That’s what the allies did after World War I, forcing impossible reparations on the Germans.  The result was resentment that fermented and eventually boiled over.  And then we got World War II.  The consequences of scorched earth policies in business negotiations may not be quite as dire.  But still, the smart move is to recognize that the completion of a transaction is usually not the end of anything. It is a phase point, after which it is better if the formerly battling parties (buyer and seller) can continue to work and live with each other in peace and harmony.  Otherwise, life is long, resentment ferments, and bad things may happen.


9 Negotiation Rules from Ken Marlin

Rule 1: Be prepared to walk away from the table.

Rule 2: Know where you are going.

Rule 3: Recognize when you have leverage—and when you don’t.

Rule 4: Tell the truth.

Rule 5: Remember the peace.

Rule 6: Negotiate big things before little things.

Rule 7: Don’t bully.

Rule 8: It is personal.

Rule 9: Take reasonable, defensible positions.


Negotiate Big Things First