How Body Language Can Define a Leader

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Photo courtesy of istockphoto/AjFilGud

This is a guest post by Erin Schwartz. Erin is responsible for marketing and social media programs at www.123Print.com, a destination site for office supplies like business cards, labels, and other supplies.

In a tough market, job applicants must take every available opportunity to stand out to employers. In addition, in the business world, first impressions can be crucial in forming relationships.

Research suggests that as much as 93% of our opinion about other people is established within the first five minutes of meeting them

Unfortunately, a person’s body language can make him stand out in an unintended negative way. The statistics vary, but some research suggests that as much as 93 percent of our opinion about other people is established within the first five minutes of meeting them. And body language can play a huge part in creating those initial perceptions. Are you a confident and capable leader? Or are you conveying the image of a lazy person who will always require prompting (and could easily be walked upon if put in a management position)?

Think about how others may interpret these aspects of your body language:

Making an Entrance

Interviewing experts caution that the assessment of job candidates often begins before they enter the interview room. Convey confidence by entering situations with your back straight and your shoulders back. Offer a firm handshake with a smile that conveys self-confidence and trust.

Be Organized

In business dealings, body language that reveals nervous energy can help give the other side the upper hand. Therefore, make sure any materials you have with you are carefully organized so you don’t fumble around during a meeting.

Posture

Sitting with an upright, straight posture will convey more internal strength than leaning back in your chair, unless the situation is a relaxed or informal meeting with coworkers you’re comfortable with. In contrast, leaning forward too much can make one seem overly eager and can make others feel uncomfortable in a one-on-one situation.

Photo by Dreaming in the deep south on flickr. Photo by Dreaming in the deep south on flickr.

4 Leadership Lessons From a Coach, a Dream and a Miracle

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This is a guest post by Dave Arnold. Dave is an author, speaker, leader, and blogger. He is the author of Pilgrims of the Alley: Living out Faith in Displacement (Urban Loft Publishing) You can also follow him on Twitter.

Herb Brooks was an incredible leader. He was a coach with a vision, a vision that led a group of college kids to beat the Soviet Union in ice hockey and go on to win the gold in the 1980 Winter Olympics. Deemed the “Miracle on Ice,” the United States’ win against the Soviets is considered one of the greatest sports moments in history. Herb Brooks wasn’t afraid to push his players, to help them believe they had what it takes. As a result, his team beat the greatest hockey team in the world. As I look back at my life, the leaders who made the most impact on me were the ones who believed in me enough to push me. They pushed me out of my comfort zone. They helped me become a better leader and, ultimately, a better person. As a leader, one of the greatest ways to impact people is by helping them believe they have what it takes. So what does that look like? Here are four lessons we can learn from Herb Brooks and his vision:

See

1. Look at people’s potential, at what they could be. Herb Brooks did this well. He not only saw a group of talented hockey players from Boston and Minnesota, he saw a team. He saw potential. He believed if he pushed enough and inspired enough, he could pull out their greatness. And that’s exactly what happened.

Encourage

2. Never underestimate the power of encouragement. As leaders, it’s easy to fall into the mode of expecting people to do certain tasks or fulfill certain roles. This is especially true in organizations. But when we are intentional about encouraging people, noticing them, and telling them they’re appreciated, it motivates them to want to keep going and give their best.

Success is nothing more than a few simple disciplines, practiced every day while failure is simply a few errors in judgment, repeated every day.  It is the accumulative weight of our disciplines and our judgments that leads us to either fortune or failure.”

Jim Rohn

Do What You Say You’re Going To Do

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It seems like a small oversight to you.

You said, “I’m going to send this to you tomorrow.”  You didn’t.

When I next talk with you, you ask me for a favor.  “It would mean so much to me if you would do this for me.  Look for a package in the mail.  When you get it, would you….?”

Surprise, surprise.  I never get it.  It’s like this with you.  In fact, more often than not, you don’t do what you say you’re going to do.

What you don’t realize is that you have this reputation.  You think it’s a careless oversight.  It’s “no big deal,” right?  You focus on the big stuff, and these little promises don’t mean much.  After all, if you try to do everything, you won’t do anything.  You justify your behavior by deluding yourself into thinking you have your priorities straight.

Doing what you say you’re going to do is an element of all successful people. Failing to do what you say you’ll do:

Erodes credibility.  If you don’t do what you say you’re going to do, your credibility decreases.   After each one of your promises, I subconsciously add a question mark to the end of it.

What A Teenager Dying of Cancer Taught Me About Leadership

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This is a guest post by Matt Tenney. As an author and a speaker, Matt shares insights from his journey as a prisoner, monk, and social entrepreneur. He teaches leaders how to improve by focusing on service to others. You can also follow him on Twitter.

As inspired as I often am by the heroes I meet through the work I do with Kids Kicking Cancer, I never thought that I would learn incredible lessons about leadership from a patient in a pediatric cancer unit. But earlier this year, that’s exactly what happened.

I had the pleasure of meeting a teenager named Daniel. It didn’t take long to realize that he is one of the most kind, polite, and positive people I have ever met. He has also lived an incredibly challenging life.

Years ago, he was diagnosed with cancer. He had surgery, went through the hell of chemo and radiation therapies, and left the hospital free of cancer thinking that he would live the rest of his life without having to worry about it.

But, within a couple years, the cancer came back. He went through the hell again, and again left the hospital thinking he was finally done with being sick.

This time, though, when the cancer came back, it was everywhere. He was told that there was nothing that could be done to treat it and that he would probably only live a few more months. I spent time with him minutes after he had received this news. It was obvious that he had cried.

It’s OK for leaders to cry.

He told me that he hadn’t started to cry until he saw his mother crying. Apparently, being told you’re going to die is not that bad. What really hurts, he said, is seeing those you love deal with the fact that they’re going to lose you soon.

Despite this news, Daniel still came to the class I led that day. In fact, he was the first to arrive and the last to leave. He was incredibly positive during the class and was a great role model for the younger students.

Great leaders continue to lead by example even when things are really, really tough.