At A Tipping Point: The Future of Education

Online Education is Changing the Game

Just over a year ago, I was named the fifth President & CEO of OCLC.  OCLC is a global technology company dedicated to connecting libraries in a global network to share the world’s knowledge.  Part of our not for profit mission includes a research division dedicated to original research on a wide range of topics involving education, libraries and technology.

Cathy DeRosa, Vice President for the Americas, recently released a fascinating market research report about online education entitled At A Tipping Point.  It is free and full of fascinating statistics.  And, online education will not only have implications for education.  It is already having a significant impact on corporate training.

In this brief five-minute interview, I talk with Cathy about the cost of higher education, online learning and the changes in the landscape ahead.

Here are a few facts from the research:

 

Mobile learning.  40% of adults ages 25-35 who have taken an online class have taken it on their mobile phone or tablet.

 

Fact: 40% of adults 25-35 who have taken an online class have taken it on a phone or tablet. @OCLC

 

Convenience wins.  The top benefit of online learning is convenience.  51% cited convenience compared to just 3% citing affordability.

 

Fact: 51% cite convenience as the top benefit of online learning. @OCLC

 

Satisfied learners.  91% of online learners say their goals were met.

 

Fact: 91% of online learners say their goals were met. @OCLC

5 Tips to Avoid a Branding Collision

Car Wreck with a car rolled over

 

A few weeks ago, I was in the middle of a traffic jam.  Not the slow moving type, but the “get comfortable you’re going nowhere type” that shouts, “You missed your morning meeting!”  Realizing that a traffic accident could be to blame, I decided to practice gratitude.

“I am thankful that I am in a comfortable car, safe and sound.  God, if someone is in an accident up ahead, please be with them and provide comfort.”

A short time later, the traffic began to move.  It’s a good thing because I can only meditate for so long before I feel trapped.  I’m sure I was there for at least an hour practicing mindfulness and gratitude, which means I was stopped for about 27 seconds.

 

Accident Ahead

As we moved up, sure enough, I could see what was causing the delay:  an accident.  I did what you would do.  I steeled my eyes on the road ahead and drove without so much as glancing.  Yeah, sure you do.  Trying to keep moving, I glanced ever so quickly to note the vehicles, the emergency responders, and a fleeting view of the injured.  I try not to look—I’ve read that rubberneckers cause numerous secondary accidents—but I’ve also read that looking may be good for you.  Eric G. Wilson, the author of Everyone Loves a Good Train Wreck: Why We Can’t Look Away, argues that it helps us understand life’s deeper meaning.

At the very least, we can tell ourselves that studying wrecks helps us learn from others’ mistakes.

As with accidents, I watch corporate disasters the same way.  Several memorable disasters including Bridgestone’s tire recall, JetBlue’s trapping passengers onboard as categorized by Business Insider.  Anything from the Paula Deen meltdown to Target’s PR nightmare qualifies.

This past week, I witnessed a different type of branding wreckage.  Sure, it may not be as noteworthy as the mistakes above.  It doesn’t involve a consumer brand name, and it doesn’t endanger anyone’s health nor involve racist or offensive remarks.

Still, it provides lessons that are worth exploring.

 

“If you are not a brand, you are a commodity.” –Philip Kotler

 

Platform Confusion

Last week, the National Speakers Association (NSA) announced it was jettisoning its venerable brand in favor of a new name.  That name is Platform.  Though I was not in attendance, I almost immediately was made aware of the announcement via emails, texts and tweets. (See also Rory Vaden‘s excellent post on this subject).

Platform?

It was almost as if I could hear the tires screeching, the glass shattering, the metal twisting.  This was a branding collision, and the onlookers would be gathering to watch.  Why?

First two disclosures:

 

DISCLOSURE #1

One of my close friends is Michael Hyatt.  He is the NYT Bestselling author of Platform: Get Noticed in a Noisy World.  He runs a conference called the Platform Conference and has an online community that will make your head spin at Platform University.  He was the driving force encouraging me to blog.  On the book jacket, you will see my endorsement:

“Michael Hyatt, one of the pioneers of social networking and blogging, shares his successful blueprint for raising your visibility. Learn from his experience and save yourself time, money and frustration by following his step-by-step advice.”

July 4 Facts, Quotes and Sayings On Liberty and Freedom

Gorgeous Fireworks Display

Today is July 4, Independence Day in the United States.  Celebrations in the U.S. generally include cookouts, games, music, and, of course, fireworks.

Regardless where you reside around the world, it is a reminder to celebrate freedom and opportunity.

The founders of America led with classic leadership traits: determination, perseverance and an unwavering commitment to ideals.  Commitment to the cause meant risking everything.  John Hancock reminded the group that they must all hang together.   He was referring to the various states. Benjamin Franklin responded with one of his classic quotes: “We must, indeed, all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately.”  Leadership, at that point, meant risking it all.

Here are some facts, quotes, and saying about freedom and liberty.

 

Fact: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson both died on the same day: July 4, 1826

 

Fact: President James Monroe also died on July 4, though five years later.

 

Fact: President Calvin Coolidge was born on July 4, 1872.

 

Fact: July 4 did not become a paid federal holiday in the US until 1938.

 

Fact: John Adams believed July 2 would be the day of celebration.

Life Lessons from Golf Great Annika Sorenstam

Annika Sorenstam is perhaps the greatest female golfer of all time.  Her many awards include ten Major Championships, 8 Player of the Year Awards, and 89 worldwide wins.  In 2013, the PGA of America named her the First Lady of Golf.  She’s the only female golfer to shoot a 59 in competition.

“There are no shortcuts to success.”  -Annika Sorenstam

 

Though Annika stepped away from competitive golf in 2008, she remains busy with commercial and philanthropic activities.  Her ANNIKA Course Design firm is busy around the world creating challenging courses everywhere from China to South Africa.  The ANNIKA Academy in Orlando is teaching players of all ages.  She is the creator of the ANNIKA Collection with Cutter & Buck.  She even created an accounting firm, ANNIKA Financial Group.  Outside of her business interests, there is the ANNIKA Foundation designed to help junior golfers.  She is active on Twitter and dedicated to her family.

“It just shows how you should never give up.” –Annika Sorenstam

 

Recently, I had the opportunity to meet Annika and her husband, Mike McGee.  In this brief 6 minute video, Annika shares:

  • The powerful words her father shared with her that motivated her throughout her career
  • How she was so afraid of public speaking that she purposely missed shots and lost games
  • How she took on the men in 2003 and how she is taking on a new challenge this year from the men’s tees at the American Century Celebrity championship
  • How she wants to give back and help others

 

“You just have to try and keep on grinding and hope that things will turn around eventually.” -Annika Sorenstam

 

“I was really never in any trouble.” –Annika Sorenstam

 

“I think it’s important for me to play well and set the tone.” –Annika Sorenstam

 

“If you think about it, the golf ball doesn’t know which country you’re in.” –Annika Sorenstam

 

“We have a challenge ahead of ourselves. You only get a chance so many times.” –Annika Sorenstam

 

“Most players practice until they get it right. Great players practice until they can’t get it wrong.” Annika Sorenstam