7 Tenets of Taxi Terry

It Started With A Question

 

“Are you ready for the best cab ride of your life?”

When the door slammed shut, Scott McKain wasn’t only taking a cab ride to his hotel.  He was embarking on one of the greatest customer experiences he could imagine.  Not only would Scott enjoy a memorable cab ride, he would exit that taxi with lessons that can make a difference in every business.

 

“Passion without effort equals failure.” –Scott McKain

 

The taxi driver, Taxi Terry, didn’t know that he had just picked up my friend, bestselling author, extraordinary professional speaker, and customer service expert Scott McKain.  Of all the people in the world to pick up at the airport, Taxi Terry picked up a global expert in standing out, in the art of distinction. In fact, he is the Chairman of the Distinction Institute.

 

7 Tenets of Taxi Terry

  1. Set high expectations and then exceed them.
  2. Delivering what helps the customer helps you.
  3. Customers are people, so personalize their experience.
  4. Think logically and then act creatively and consistently.
  5. Make the customer the star of your show.
  6. Help your customers come back for more.
  7. Creating joy for your customer will make your work–and life–more joyful.

 

That simple, enthusiastic question, directed to an exhausted traveler one night was the beginning of a customer experience that tens of thousands of people have learned from. Scott has presented the lessons he learned to audiences around the world.  And the lessons are now available in a new book, one that will inspire you.  7 Tenets of Taxi Terry is sure to be one of the enduring business books that will come up in conversations everywhere (yes, even in a cab!).

 

“If you want your business to get better, the first step is for you to get better.” –Scott McKain

 

Do You Want to Create Memorable Customer Experiences?

At A Tipping Point: The Future of Education

Online Education is Changing the Game

Just over a year ago, I was named the fifth President & CEO of OCLC.  OCLC is a global technology company dedicated to connecting libraries in a global network to share the world’s knowledge.  Part of our not for profit mission includes a research division dedicated to original research on a wide range of topics involving education, libraries and technology.

Cathy DeRosa, Vice President for the Americas, recently released a fascinating market research report about online education entitled At A Tipping Point.  It is free and full of fascinating statistics.  And, online education will not only have implications for education.  It is already having a significant impact on corporate training.

In this brief five-minute interview, I talk with Cathy about the cost of higher education, online learning and the changes in the landscape ahead.

Here are a few facts from the research:

 

Mobile learning.  40% of adults ages 25-35 who have taken an online class have taken it on their mobile phone or tablet.

 

Fact: 40% of adults 25-35 who have taken an online class have taken it on a phone or tablet. @OCLC

 

Convenience wins.  The top benefit of online learning is convenience.  51% cited convenience compared to just 3% citing affordability.

 

Fact: 51% cite convenience as the top benefit of online learning. @OCLC

 

Satisfied learners.  91% of online learners say their goals were met.

 

Fact: 91% of online learners say their goals were met. @OCLC

5 Tips to Avoid a Branding Collision

Car Wreck with a car rolled over

 

A few weeks ago, I was in the middle of a traffic jam.  Not the slow moving type, but the “get comfortable you’re going nowhere type” that shouts, “You missed your morning meeting!”  Realizing that a traffic accident could be to blame, I decided to practice gratitude.

“I am thankful that I am in a comfortable car, safe and sound.  God, if someone is in an accident up ahead, please be with them and provide comfort.”

A short time later, the traffic began to move.  It’s a good thing because I can only meditate for so long before I feel trapped.  I’m sure I was there for at least an hour practicing mindfulness and gratitude, which means I was stopped for about 27 seconds.

 

Accident Ahead

As we moved up, sure enough, I could see what was causing the delay:  an accident.  I did what you would do.  I steeled my eyes on the road ahead and drove without so much as glancing.  Yeah, sure you do.  Trying to keep moving, I glanced ever so quickly to note the vehicles, the emergency responders, and a fleeting view of the injured.  I try not to look—I’ve read that rubberneckers cause numerous secondary accidents—but I’ve also read that looking may be good for you.  Eric G. Wilson, the author of Everyone Loves a Good Train Wreck: Why We Can’t Look Away, argues that it helps us understand life’s deeper meaning.

At the very least, we can tell ourselves that studying wrecks helps us learn from others’ mistakes.

As with accidents, I watch corporate disasters the same way.  Several memorable disasters including Bridgestone’s tire recall, JetBlue’s trapping passengers onboard as categorized by Business Insider.  Anything from the Paula Deen meltdown to Target’s PR nightmare qualifies.

This past week, I witnessed a different type of branding wreckage.  Sure, it may not be as noteworthy as the mistakes above.  It doesn’t involve a consumer brand name, and it doesn’t endanger anyone’s health nor involve racist or offensive remarks.

Still, it provides lessons that are worth exploring.

 

“If you are not a brand, you are a commodity.” –Philip Kotler

 

Platform Confusion

Last week, the National Speakers Association (NSA) announced it was jettisoning its venerable brand in favor of a new name.  That name is Platform.  Though I was not in attendance, I almost immediately was made aware of the announcement via emails, texts and tweets. (See also Rory Vaden‘s excellent post on this subject).

Platform?

It was almost as if I could hear the tires screeching, the glass shattering, the metal twisting.  This was a branding collision, and the onlookers would be gathering to watch.  Why?

First two disclosures:

 

DISCLOSURE #1

One of my close friends is Michael Hyatt.  He is the NYT Bestselling author of Platform: Get Noticed in a Noisy World.  He runs a conference called the Platform Conference and has an online community that will make your head spin at Platform University.  He was the driving force encouraging me to blog.  On the book jacket, you will see my endorsement:

“Michael Hyatt, one of the pioneers of social networking and blogging, shares his successful blueprint for raising your visibility. Learn from his experience and save yourself time, money and frustration by following his step-by-step advice.”

July 4 Facts, Quotes and Sayings On Liberty and Freedom

Gorgeous Fireworks Display

Today is July 4, Independence Day in the United States.  Celebrations in the U.S. generally include cookouts, games, music, and, of course, fireworks.

Regardless where you reside around the world, it is a reminder to celebrate freedom and opportunity.

The founders of America led with classic leadership traits: determination, perseverance and an unwavering commitment to ideals.  Commitment to the cause meant risking everything.  John Hancock reminded the group that they must all hang together.   He was referring to the various states. Benjamin Franklin responded with one of his classic quotes: “We must, indeed, all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately.”  Leadership, at that point, meant risking it all.

Here are some facts, quotes, and saying about freedom and liberty.

 

Fact: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson both died on the same day: July 4, 1826

 

Fact: President James Monroe also died on July 4, though five years later.

 

Fact: President Calvin Coolidge was born on July 4, 1872.

 

Fact: July 4 did not become a paid federal holiday in the US until 1938.

 

Fact: John Adams believed July 2 would be the day of celebration.