7 Steps to Improve Your Character Habit

build habits reminder - self-development concept - handwriting o

Not too long ago, I had the opportunity to talk with Fred Kiel, the author of Return on Character: The Real Reasons Leaders and Their Companies Win.  His extensive research provides data that proves that character matters.  That same research also indicated that much of the character habits of the world’s best, virtuous leaders are formed in childhood.  Fred offers seven steps to improve your character habits.

Improving Character

It absolutely is possible to improve Return on Character (“ROC”) and raise your character reputation scores.  Your character habits are just that – habits.  And as such, they can be changed.  We all have some personal experience in changing our habits.  Sometimes it’s quite difficult, but it can be done.

We’ve isolated seven steps that work to improve your character habits:

1. Pop the Bubble

The first step you need to take to strengthen your character habits is to get real!  We all live in our own “bubble” – our version of ourselves.  Unfortunately, our view of ourselves is often wrong – we tend to believe our own press.  Everyone rates themselves as having a strong character – we see ourselves as principled people.

“Real knowledge is to know the extent of one’s ignorance.” -Confucius

 

2. Conduct a Cost-Benefit Analysis

Be brutally honest with yourself.  You have acquired your character habits because at some point in your life, they were very beneficial. But in all likelihood, some of the habits learned long ago are now more costly than beneficial.


“Being entirely honest with oneself is a good exercise.” –Sigmund Freud

 

3. Find the Fuel

The only way you’ll go the next step in changing your character is if you believe that the cost of your current habit outweighs the benefit.  You must find the “fuel rod” that will energize you enough to acquire a new habit.

“What keeps me going is goals.” -Muhammad Ali

 

4. Now, Write it Down

The important thing now is to write down what you’ve decided from your cost-benefit analysis.  If you can’t write it down and provide a convincing argument about why you should change, you’re just living in la-la land.  You won’t change anything about your character habits.

“If you do not write it down, you have a wish, not a goal.” -Steve Maraboli

 

5. Focus Your Attention

Are You Drowning Your Team?

Watering Garden

Enough.

I was enjoying a quiet walk a few years ago.  As I approached one of my neighbors’ homes, I could hear a garden hose running.  Not wanting to get wet, I crossed the street.  Glancing to my right, I could see the hose running at full strength into a large planter.

The planter was overflowing and the water draining down the side and into the driveway.  A little stream was running right down the other street.  Crossing back across the street, I thought I would turn off the hose.  Clearly someone left it on by mistake.  Only a few steps later, I saw my neighbor.

 

“Sharing too much drowns a listener, destroying opportunities for growth.” -Skip Prichard

 

“Hi.  I thought I would turn off your hose,” I said.

“Oh, I’m watering everything a lot extra today,” before adding, “We’re going away for a few weeks so I wanted to water in advance.  It’s going to be really hot this week!”

“Not sure it works that way,” I said, smiling.  “I’m happy to water everything for you,” I offered.

After he declined my offer, I shook my head and continued my walk.

Ability may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there.” – John Wooden

John Wooden

28 Quotes to Celebrate Earth Day

Image of Earth planet in human hands. Protect planet.

Our planet Earth has its own day of celebration: April 22nd.  In 1970, Senator Gaylord Nelson founded Earth Day.  Now celebrated around the world, it’s a day when we pause to think about the environment.

 

“When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.”-John Muir

 

“Earth provides enough to satisfy every man’s need, but not every man’s greed.”-Gandhi

 

“The more clearly we can focus our attention on the wonders and realities of the universe about us, the less taste we shall have for destruction.”-Rachel Carson

 

“Look deep into nature and you will understand everything better.”-Einstein

 

“This world is but a canvas to our imagination.”
-Henry David Thoreau

 

“Now I see the secret of making the best person: it is to grow in the open air and to eat and sleep with the earth.”-Walt Whitman

 

“Earth laughs in flowers.” -Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

“Where flowers bloom, so does hope.”-Lady Bird Johnson

 

“The wide world is all about you: you can fence yourselves in, but you cannot forever fence it out.”-J.R.R. Tolkien

 

“He that plants trees loves others beside himself.”-Thomas Fuller

 

“The world is not in your books and maps, it’s out there.”-J.R.R. Tolkien

 

“Be the change you wish to see in this world.”-Gandhi

 

“Aim at heaven and you will get earth thrown in. Aim at earth and you get neither.”-C.S. Lewis

 

“Nature always wears the colors of the spirit.” -Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

“When the well’s dry, we know the worth of water.”-Benjamin Franklin

5 Lessons on Innovation from Outlander’s Diana Gabaldon

A Creative Force

One of the most innovative people I have ever met is my friend Diana Gabaldon. Last year, her wildly popular Outlander novels became even more popular as the new television series was released. Whether you are reading her Outlander series or her Lord John novels, you will be hard pressed to categorize her writing. Most critics give up and classify her work with a list of descriptive words ranging from historical fiction and romance to mystery and adventure.

However you describe her novels, you may find it even more challenging to describe the author. Diana is equal parts scholar, writer and historian. Mix in a bit of archivist; stir in comic book writing, and the unique recipe begins to take shape.

When I first met Diana, I had not read any of her books. She captivated me by the way she told a story. How she went from college professor to best-selling author was a story I will never forget.

Here are a few lessons I learned from the impossible-to-describe creative force named Diana Gabaldon:

 

Lessons from A Creative Mind

1. Try….why not take a chance? 

It seems that most people have an idea, think they should do something, and then push that dream into a drawer. They never really give it a go.

Years ago, Diana read comic books. She felt the writing quality was declining and that she could do it herself. Have you ever felt that way? You see something and think, “I can do better.” Most of us have. What sets Diana apart is that she didn’t stop there. She investigated. She found out who was in charge and then turned in a submission.

Years later, Diana would take a different chance. She thought that she would like to try writing a novel. That try, what she calls the novel she was writing for “practice,” became Outlander.

What idea have you had that you have left in that drawer? What could you do to give birth to something new?

 

2. Study…for the love of creating.

Long before her mega success as an author, Diana spent years as a university professor.  She has a PhD in Quantitative Behavioral Ecology. She also holds degrees in marine biology and zoology. That type of academic success shows an underlying love of learning.

And it’s that same love of learning she uses in the meticulous research for her books.  Her fiction books are known for their accuracy, and it is no wonder.  Her personal library includes thousands of books. Her Arizona home alone contains over 1500 reference works on topics such as warfare techniques, poisons and history. Some of the topics are very specific, such as the art of passementarie (the knotted tassels on 18th century furnishings) or the 126 books on herbals. If you have been searching for Sam Johnson’s Dictionary (1755) or Captain Francis Grose’s A Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue (1811), look no further.

Often people look for the shortcuts to success. You may hear that Diana decided to write a book and then found herself on the NYT list. The truth is that great public success is almost always the result of planting, tilling and working in private.

Diana Gabaldon's bookcase, Used by Permission Diana Gabaldon’s bookcase, Used by Permission

 

3. Fail…and keep going!