Why You Should Comment on Blogs

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I’ve been blogging for just over two years now.  One of the strange things I have noticed:

Most readers are not bloggers, but it seems that most commenters are bloggers.

Why You Should Comment

So, if you aren’t a blogger, why should you comment on a blog?

If you like what you read, it is hugely rewarding to the blogger when you share the post via your social networks.  When I see a post take off, I know what is resonating and it helps me prioritize what to write about in future posts.

Most readers are not bloggers, but it seems that most commenters are bloggers. -Skip Prichard

There’s nothing worse than writing a post and hearing nothing but crickets.

In addition to sharing, consider adding a comment.

Why comment?  Well, technically it helps the blog because it shows that the page is updated.  That, in turn, increases the relevance and the chance that Google will rate the blog higher.

But that’s not why you should do it.

ENCOURAGE

Yes, that’s reason enough.  If you like the blog you are reading, why not encourage the blogger by jumping in?  When I started commenting on other blogs, I saw the power of a little encouragement. Feedback matters. In addition to encouraging the blogger, I have noticed that it encourages the community of readers at the site to think about issues differently.

INFLUENCE

What I like to see is the dialogue, the conversation, the debate, or the agreement.  You may add a story or an additional thought.  You may agree or point out something that I missed.  You may change someone’s thinking.  My own views are more informed when I read what others are writing.

RELATIONSHIP

You are able to build a relationship with someone fast when you comment regularly.  I have made friends this way and have connected with my regular commenters, too.  It makes a difference.

Why don’t most readers comment?  It ranges from fear of making a mistake to not knowing how to do it or even worrying about getting spam email.  It really isn’t hard.  Most blogs, like this one, do not spam you or send you any email because of your comments.

COMMUNITY

I receive a lot of personal email from people about posts I write, but I have decided not to engage in side conversations for the most part.  Because, if you have a comment or question, others likely will have the same one.  Why not let everyone benefit?  And, frankly, I just don’t have the time to answer a question many times when it could be done once.

Why Bloggers Comment

Why do bloggers comment on other blogs?

If you study Web marketing, you know that there are many reasons you want to be a regular commenter.  A few of those reasons are:

  • Gain traffic back to your Website.
  • Build backlinks to your blog.
  • Build a relationship with the other blogger or the community.
  • Increase your authority as an expert.
  • Improve your search ranking with the search engines.
  • Because they appreciate and know how hard the job of blogging really is!

A SPECIAL THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HAS EVER LEFT A COMMENT ON THIS BLOG.

I do have a comments policy where I reserve the right to delete any comment that is inappropriate, spam, advertising, offensive, profane, or for whatever reason is not wanted.  That’s the right of the blogger.  I try to leave comments that disagree with me and have only deleted a handful of comments in two years.

 

 

3 Challenges for Emerging Leaders

 

 

Recently, I had the opportunity to sit down with Anya Kamenetz to talk about the state of education.  Anya is a staff writer for Fast Company, a columnist for Tribune Media, and she is the author of two books:  Generation Debt and DIY U.

Education, debt, and opportunity for young people will have a profound effect on the world in coming years.

Future Leaders:

1. Face unprecedented levels of debt.

Generation Debt outlines the deleterious effects of student loans and credit card spending.  Young people are facing unique economic challenges and face decisions unlike other generations.  The cost of education is going up, and the ability to pay debt off is going down.

2.  Operate in a rapidly changing educational environment.

DIY U is a about the transformation underway in education.  Everything is changing from K12 to higher education, from early testing to admittance, to the consumption of course materials.

She is currently working on her next book, The Test, which will focus on the data-driven accountability models in K12 education.

3.  Mature in a different timeframe.

In Generation Debt, Anya indicates that 46% of men and 31% of women in 2000 can be considered “grown up” by the age of thirty.  Forty years earlier, in 1960, those numbers were 65% of men and 77% of women.

Anya and I discuss the challenges facing young people today.  Despite all of these challenges, Anya is optimistic about the next generation.  She indicates that they seize control, are resilient, and have a sense of possibility.  That positive view gives me great hope.

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The Hype and Hope of MOOCs

 

 

A few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to host an expert panel debate on the subject of MOOCs.

What are MOOC’s, you ask?

It stands for Massive Open Online Courses.  In the world of education and training, they have garnered considerable attention and debate.  Some say that this new technology will change higher education forever, causing thousands of traditional institutions to disappear while it dramatically lowers the cost of education.  Others say it holds promise, but the hype has gone too far.  The MOOC will change education in various ways, but it will not lead to a fundamental transformation.

Outside of formal higher education, MOOCs hold enormous potential for continuing education, professional development and training.  Organizations that want to grow must grow people, and MOOCs offer an opportunity to learn in a completely new way.  On my recent trip to Africa, I had many conversations about the transformative potential MOOCs offer in this regard.  Corporate leaders should be studying this potential.

The above video is an abbreviated snapshot of the conversation.  If you would like to see the entire MOOC debate, it is here.

Many thanks to the panel participants:

Bryan Alexander, author of The New Digital Storytelling, an editor of the Horizon Report and a frequent writer/speaker on digital technology in education;

Anya Kamenetz, a contributing writer for Fast Company, the Digital/Edu blogger for the Hechinger Report, and author of Generation Debt and DIY U.

Ray Schroeder, Professor Emeritus and Associate Vice Chancellor for Online Learning at the University of Illinois at Springfield, and Director of the Center for Online Leadership and Strategy at the University Professional and Continuing Education Association;

Audrey Watters, a technology journalist and founder of Hack Education;

Cathy De Rosa, OCLC Vice President for the Americas and Global Vice President of Marketing.

 

Seeing the Future at CES

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If you want to be more creative, get around creative people.  If you want to spark innovation, immerse yourself in the latest technologies.  If you want to envision the future, tune in to voices shaping tomorrow.

CES is the Consumer Electronic Show in Las Vegas.  It highlights the world’s most cutting-edge consumer technologies.  On display:  Fitness devices, 3D printing, robotics, all things motion, educational technologies, cars, audio, video, gaming, sensor technologies, next generation tablets, drones, wearable technologies.

This week, I’m attending the Consumer Electronic Show (CES) in Las Vegas, dunked in innovation, creativity and the future.  I am enjoying the opportunity to experience the latest technologies.  I’m always amazed at the benefits from attending this conference, including the opportunity to meet with content creators, technologists, thought leaders, and technology executives.  The range of people I was able to see this year ranged from librarians to publishers to university researchers.

There are literally thousands of new things to see, so my brief overview will be a random selection.  With so many interests and things to share, I set a timer to write this post.  When it rings, I will stop.  And I will try to feature a few things you may not see in the mainstream media.  Here we go:

SLEEP:

photo 1-6For those of us with chronic insomnia or sleep problems, there are a number of new apps and devices to help.  One that intrigues me is Beddit.  Beddit doesn’t require you to wear a device at night (which for me makes my sleep even worse).  Instead, you place a sensor under your bed sheet, and it connects wirelessly to your device.  It tracks sleep quality, heart rate, breathing, snoring and bedroom noise.  It then provides personal coaching to improve your sleep.

The best shortcut to being more creative: get around creative people. -Skip Prichard

HYGIENE:

In the “everything seems to be connected” category, Kolibree introduces the world’s first connected toothbrush.  You can watch your brushing habits progress.photo-23

If you wear glasses, look out for a car wash for your glasses.  At $1, it had the “theatre factor” and drew a crowd.  My glasses were clean, dry and sanitized in no time.  Look for these showing up in high-traffic areas or near the beach where everyone wears glasses.

Walking by Panasonic to see the new 4K Toughpad, I noticed a range of beauty products. At CES, you find what you are not looking for and what you don’t expect.

SECURITY:

Who can possibly remember all of the passwords required in today’s digital age?  Now myIDkey uses biometric technology to authenticate your identity and display your information when you need it.  All safely protected with military grade encryption.

photo 5-5Ever worry when the lights go out in a power outage? Worry no more with a light that senses the power is out and stays on.

And to keep your home secure, Okidokeys allows you to unlock doors with any mobile phone or a smart wristband.  Most of us are never out of reach of our mobile phone, making lost keys a thing of the past.

FITNESS AND MEDICAL:

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Are you forgetful?  Have an aging parent?  The Smart Pill Box from imedipac solves these problems.  It even allows alerts to family and relatives.

 

 

Numerous new fitness applications are on display everywhere.  Improve your golf or tennis game with a biometric analysis of your swing.  The new devices go far beyond measuring how many steps you take in a day and now monitor blood pressure, blood sugar, calculating carb intake, maximizing your fitness performance, and even detecting concussions.  Perhaps you want to wear a camera to take your coach into the action.

The Best Book Covers of 2013

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Readers of this blog know that I love books.  There must be some psychological label for someone who must have a book within reach at all times.  Whether at home or at the office, whether on a flight or a long drive, I am uncomfortable unless a book is close by.

In recent years, my career has me surrounded with books.  As I walk down an aisle of books, I need to use all my willpower not to stop and start browsing. And what captures my attention?  Book covers.

Book Covers Pull You In

Do you ever buy a book because you are attracted to its cover?  Book covers do that.  A well-designed book jacket stops you. Maybe makes you squint or smile or pause for a second. It calls you to pick up the book and look inside.

Each year, I make a list of the best book covers.  Here is my 2013 list. (And, if you missed, here are the best book covers of 2012 and 2011.) What’s your favorite?

I Hate to Leave this Beautiful Place by Howard Norman

I Hate to Leave this Beautiful Place by Howard Norman

 

Shouting Won’t Help by Katherine Bouton

Shouting Won’t Help by Katherine Bouton

 

Doctor Sleep by Stephen King

Doctor Sleep by Stephen King

 

Devoted: 38 Extraordinary Tales of Love, Loyalty, and Life With Dogs by Rebecca Ascher-Walsh

Devoted: 38 Extraordinary Tales of Love, Loyalty, and Life With Dogs by Rebecca Ascher-Walsh

 

Creative You: Using Your Personality Type to Thrive by David Goldstein and Otto Kroeger (see my interview with David Goldstein here.)

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East of Denver by Gregory Hill

East of Denver by Gregory Hill