Silent Intelligence: What A Smarter World Will Mean For You

 

Everything Will Be Smart

The Internet has connected people in a way that has transformed the world.  From e-commerce to e-mail, from social networking to videoconferencing, from high-speed wires to wireless, technology has transformed life as we know it.

 

“The future is already here. It’s just not evenly distributed.” –William Gibson

 

What’s next is the Internet of Things (IoT).  In addition to connecting people, the Internet is now connecting things: objects, machines and networks of sensors.  Your refrigerator, your car, your security system.  Nearly anything you can think of can be connected to the Internet.

 

“Business is going to change more in the next ten years than it has in the last fifty.” Bill Gates

 

Imagine a smart garden where the soil signals it needs water.  Smart medical devices that transmit exact health data to your doctor in real time, allowing medications to be administered and monitored.  Smart cities that move electricity just where it is needed.  Smart thermostats are here today, sensing your habits and making adjustments without you touching anything.

 

“Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.”  Arthur C. Clarke

 

Daniel Obodovski and Daniel Kellmereit wrote a book called The Silent Intelligence: The Internet of Things.  It explores the Internet of Things and the “silent intelligence” growing all around us.

I recently had the opportunity to talk with one of the book’s authors, Daniel Obodovski, about the Internet of Things and the changes ahead for all of us.

 

“All creative people want to do the unexpected.” –Hedy Lamarr

 

“We are at the 1908 Hurley washing machine stage with the Internet” — Jeff Bezos

 

“Cheap, functional, reliable things unleash the creativity of people who then build stuff that you could not imagine. There’s no way of predicting the Internet based on the first transistor.” — George Whitesides

 

 

The Silent Intelligence: The Internet of Things

4 Ways to Get Appreciated at Work

Happy team of business people posing in modern office environmen

 

“The deepest craving of human nature is the need to be appreciated.”  -William James

 

Undervalued

 

Usually, I would run into my friend at the gym.  He was always full of energy, smiling, and lifting more weight than seemed humanly possible.

One day, I was leaving when I noticed him arriving at the gym.  He was walking slower than normal with his shoulders slumped.  His trademark smile was missing.

Though I really didn’t have time to talk, I asked him how he was.

“I’m good,” he responded, a bit too quickly and with an even less convincing acting job than he realized.

 

“The deepest craving of human nature is the need to be appreciated.”  -William James

 

“Want to grab a cup of coffee and chat for a minute?” I asked.

We sat down at a table with our coffee.  I’m not one to waste much time and jumped right to the issue.

“What’s up?  You are clearly down.  Why?  What’s going on in your life?”

“I don’t know.  The Preds lost last night.”

I knew him well enough to know that his hockey team losing a game was not the cause of his change in attitude.  Here was a guy who would regularly bounce off of walls with his energy.

I didn’t even need to say anything.  He could read skepticism in my face.  If he missed it, I would recommend he check his vision.

“Ok.  I just feel unappreciated at work.  I turn something in, and I just get overloaded with more and more.  Every once in a while, a little recognition would be nice.  Maybe a bonus?  Heck, even a beer would be cool.”

Appreciation.  It’s what William James says is the greatest human need.

Stay at home moms (or dads):  you know what this is about more than most.  Thankless chores.  Constant demands.  And the world shows little respect for your efforts.

 

“I praise loudly. I blame softly.” -Catherine the Great

 

Reasons Your Boss Does Not Appreciate Your Work

 

There are many reasons you may be unappreciated at work.

Here are a few:

You’re not doing a good job.

You’re boss doesn’t realize the work you are doing.

Your boss is overworked and overwhelmed.

Your boss is a jerk.

Your boss isn’t skilled in recognizing others.

Your boss has childhood issues and needs therapy.

 

I shared with my friend some ideas for him to consider:

You should change your perspective.

More work may equal appreciation.  Your boss may be recognizing your good work by giving you more work.  He may not be expressing it in the way that you want to hear it, but for some people this is how it works.  More work = great job!  When you think of it that way, you may find ways to utilize this for your benefit.

3 Common Mistakes of Strategic Planning

Chess - Bad Move

 

I’m always looking for ways to improve the strategic planning from a dreaded annual activity to a meaningful, helpful process.

Recently, I had the opportunity to read Elevate: The Three Disciplines of Advanced Strategic Thinking by Rich Horwath.  Rich has helped numerous companies and managers with the strategic planning process and evaluating strategic capabilities.  I had the opportunity to talk with Rich about the most common mistakes leaders make.

 

“If your strategic plan isn’t driving daily activities, then you’ve wasted time doing the plan.” -Rich Horwath

 

3 Common Mistakes of Strategic Planning

 

Rich, you’ve worked on strategy both as the CEO of the Strategic Thinking Institute and before that as a Chief Strategy Officer.  What are the most common mistakes you see in strategic planning?

 

There are typically three mistakes when it comes to strategic planning.

 

“The number one cause of bankruptcy is bad strategy.” -Rich Horwath

 

Mistake #1:  Confusing strategy with other planning terms.

 

The first is the group not having a universal understanding of what strategy is and how it differs from other key planning terms such as mission, vision, goals, objectives and tactics. There’s a tremendous lack of precision when it comes to strategic planning and that starts with the fundamental building blocks.

 

“Concepts change thinking and tools change behavior.” -Rich Horwath

 

Mistake #2:  Regurgitating last year’s plan.

 

The second is that most plans are simply a regurgitation of last year’s plan.  This is because managers don’t think before they plan.  I’m a big believer that new growth comes from new thinking.  If you don’t take time and tools to generate new insights, then don’t expect your group to perform any better than the year before, or the year before that.

 

Mistake #3:  Not linking the strategic plan to daily activities.

The 8 Biggest Mobile Mistakes Companies Make

holding a glowing earth and tablet,mobile phone in his hands

 

Over 6 billion people around the world have access to a mobile device.  Time points out that more people have access to a mobile phone than toilets.   These devices are now so important to us that they are almost an extension of our bodies.

As a lawyer, I was captivated to see what the Supreme Court would rule in Riley v. California.  In a rare 9-0 decision, the Supreme Court recognized the importance of mobile devices and held that the police need a warrant to search cell phones.  Even the Supreme Court knows:

Mobile is changing everything.

 

Fact: Half of all local internet searches are performed on mobile devices. –SmartInsights.com

 

The Mobile Revolution

Tom Eslinger, Saatchi & Saatchi’s Worldwide Director of Digital and Social is an expert on mobile marketing.  His recent book The Saatchi & Saatchi Guide to Mobile Marketing got my attention.  It is filled with facts about mobile and a peek into our mobile future.  Tom has helped brands like Toyota, Coca-Cola, T-Mobile, Lexus, Visa, Sony Ericsson, Heineken, and Procter & Gamble with mobile, augmented reality and games.  Who better than Tom to share insights on how organizations are using mobile today?

 

You are enthusiastic about mobile (understatement!). Why?

We can see a steady trend over the last five years in major industries, beginning with the retail consumer marketing-structure as it becomes more fluent with mobile technology.  Mobile devices have already exceeded desktops.  We, consumers, are essentially becoming a culture of detachment and wirelessness.  So, having a mobile-first strategy will be critical for any company over the next five years – and perhaps even the next five months.

 

“Having a mobile-first strategy will be critical for any company over the next five years.” –Tom Eslinger

 

Tom, what are the top mistakes companies are making with mobile?

 

1. Don’t Support Your Campaign

The importance of maintaining your mobile presence can’t be stressed enough.  Slacking off on maintenance can sabotage the best-laid plans.  This means keeping your audience engaged, often at multiple levels of engagement.  And of course, you need to pay attention to the stuff that keeps it all going: server networks, customer care, and technical support.  You can expect to spend around 1.5 times your creation costs on on-going marketing and program maintenance costs.  It’s that important.

 

“Keep your customer at the center of the experience so they keep coming back for more.” –Tom Eslinger

 

2. Think You Have No Bugs

No programmer has ever built anything bug-free from the get-go.

It’s guaranteed that the first version of your mobile product—and many subsequent versions—are going to have some bugs that make it past the testing period.  It’s nothing to panic about, but continue to iterate on your product after it’s released.

 

3. Don’t Keep Up Interest in Your Mobile App

Don’t just let it sit there!

Have an extended plan for the app.  How are you going to update it, change it, push new content through it, and ultimately, perhaps know when to end it?  Push notifications can get really annoying really fast, so make them relevant and desirable.  Have the copywriters rewrite the engineers’ reports in your brand’s voice.

 

Fact: 42 percent of consumers using a mobile while in-store spend more than $1000. IAB

 

4. Try to Do Too Much