7 Game Changers To Improve Your Leadership Position

Shift Your State

Shift Your State

Anese Cavanaugh’s new work, Contagious Culture: Show Up, Set the Tone, and Intentionally Create an Organization that Thrives is a terrific guide to upping your leadership and creating a positive, contagious atmosphere.

After our first interview, I thought to ask Anese about some of her tips for shifting someone’s state. Why? Because it’s one of the most important aspect of leadership. The ability to help someone from one state to another is a skill that every leader should master.

 

Leadership Tip: Increase your awareness of what is working and the impact your choices have.

 

7 Game Changers

In your work as an advisor and “thinking partner” to leaders and organizations, you developed 7 game changers to shift someone’s state. What has been your experience using them as a coaching tool?Anese Cavanaugh

I’ve found that even offering these as places for people to look can make them game changers within themselves. So much of this work is about awareness. Awareness as to what’s working – and what’s not, awareness of their role and impact in how things are and how their choices have led them here, awareness that they can choose, awareness that there’s dissatisfaction, awareness of the impact their relationships have on them (and vice versa), and awareness that they can very much in fact do something to shift things – even if that something is just getting a bit of extra water, finding ONE thing they’re grateful for, telling someone they see how great they are, taking ownership and cleaning something up, asking for help, or finding (and claiming) the request (or wish) that lives underneath their complaint. Once they have awareness that these 7 things have impact – they can get into action. Big or small.

 

7 Game Changers To Improve Your Leadership Position

1: Do your work. Be accountable for your choices.

2: Stop complaining and start resolving.

3: Ask for help-admit your glorious imperfections.

4: Surround yourself with good people.

5: Practice gratitude, even for the stuff that hurts.

6: Eat well. Really well. Move your body. Drink water.

7: Love your kids. Love your friends. Love your people. Love yourself. Remember who you are.

 

Simple ways to integrate these 7 points is to take each one and try it on for a day. For example, ask: Where do I need to show up bigger? Where can I be more accountable for the choices I’ve made? How did my choices lead me here? What choice can I make now to start shifting this in the right direction? How would I like things to be instead? Where do I need help? Where am I making “looking good” more important than asking for help or creating real and positive impact? Who’s my professional posse / my advisory board? How am I taking care of myself? (Truly?) What’s the littlest thing I can do to shift ANY of these? Little things make big ripples.

 

Shift From Complaining to Doing

How to Become An Authentic Leader

Be Authentic

A few months ago, I read Henna Inam’s new book, Wired for Authenticity: Seven Practices to Inspire, Adapt & Lead and subsequently posted an interview with her. Her work on leadership authenticity is not only fascinating, but is essential for any aspiring leader to master. Recently, I had the opportunity to meet Henna and talk more about being an authentic leader.

Throughout all of our discussion and throughout all of Henna’s writing, I noticed a key theme: service to others. Everything we do should be in a place of service. It’s one of the reasons I was drawn to her work.

 

“Authentic leadership is about leading from the core of who we are.” -Henna Inam

 

Here are a few lessons from Henna on becoming an authentic leader:

 

Defeat the Inner Saboteur

How an Interim CEO Saves a Company in 9 Steps

Save A Company
This is a guest post by Richard Lindenmuth. Richard has been an Interim CEO in a number of industries. He has over 30 years general management experience in operations and is noted for his comprehensive execution skills. Lindenmuth is Chairman of the Association of Interim Executives. He is the author of The Outside the Box Executive.

I’ve led major corporate transformations and turnarounds for decades — taking ITT and 12,000 employees through deregulation into record profits; overhauling Styrotek, a California agricultural packaging company, in 3 months during a drought. That’s the job of an Interim CEO: to parachute in, rebuild a jumpy staff’s trust and engagement, and manage profound change. It takes a unique skill set, but as I wrote in my new book, The Outside the Box Executive, extreme leadership is really leadership, just the condensed version: there are lessons for everyone.

 

“Leading by proxy is not leading.” Richard Lindenmuth

 

Here are my 9 steps for saving a struggling company:

 

9 Steps for Saving a Struggling Company

 

1. Hit the ground leading.

Don’t ask permission to start making decisions and forming strategies: do it. The Board brought you in to do a job. And don’t dispatch a group of VPs to speak for you. Leading by proxy is not leading, particularly in today’s business culture, where transparency matters (for good reason).

2. Get out of your office.

To learn about a company’s daily operations, its staff (good and bad), and its problems and challenges, you have to get out there. Don’t hide behind your desk. Walk the halls and let everyone see you.

3. Talk less, listen more.

I recommend active listening, in which you repeat back what someone tells you, and continue that cycle until you reach common ground. It forges mutual respect, paving the way for the honest opinions and information you need for your own due diligence. While an Interim CEO draws from outside experience to set direction and strategy, listening creates the necessary knowledge base.

4. Do your own homework.

No CEO is an island.You’ll need a team of the best and brightest to rely on, but forge your own impressions and make your own judgment calls. That way, when someone’s not being entirely above board, you know it. That’s how I stopped a damaging game of politics at one firm: I knew the difference between reality and rumor.

 

“A floundering company is a dangerous behemoth.” Richard Lindenmuth

 

Draw Your Dreams Into Reality

“A picture can create movements.” –Patti Dobrowolski

Draw Your Dreams

Research shows that out of ten people who set goals, nine never actually make any real changes. So how do you become the one that does? Business consultant Patti Dobrowolski says achieving goals is all about tricking the brain.

Her suggested method for change is simple: see it, believe it and then your brain will help you execute it.

It sounds so simple that most people, I bet, won’t actually do it.

 

“See it, believe it, act on it.” –Patti Dobrowolski

 

Visualize Your Future State

Draw yourself in your current state and then in your desired new reality, where you want to be. Drawing a visual has a powerful effect on the brain. Fill in the picture with tons of color; channel your inner kid and draw the most daring picture you can. Soak in the picture of your future. Dobrowolski says the brain emits serotonin when you draw, leaving you feeling creative and happy.

 

“A solitary fantasy can transform a million realities.” –Maya Angelou

 

Become the 1 out of 10 to Change

Your brain will actually guess what steps it needs to take to get you from your current state to your desired reality. Then act on it, do one small thing each day that will get you closer to your dream. Draw out your dream and become that one person out of ten to make a change.

 

Research: The odds against you making a change in your life are 9:1.