How Many Vlogging, Nerdfighting, Bestsellering Authors Do You Know?

Only a few weeks ago, I knew very little about John Green.  I was told he was a huge Vlogger, but that didn’t help since I had never heard of that either.  Vlogging, it turns out, is video blogging.  John Green and his brother, Hank, run an unbelievably popular video blog with over seven million views per month!  Years ago, they decided to give up all textual communications and launched a video conversation that soon went viral.  They also have an entire community of “Nerdfighters,” dedicated to fighting what they call “world suck” (apparently anything in the world that is the opposite of awesomeness.)

What’s Your Skin Type?

Thick Skin Photo

Photo courtesy of stock.xchng/g_jacobsen

Most of the time, you will see leadership advice admonishing younger managers to be thick skinned.  Ditto for advice to new authors, songwriters or anyone in the public arena.  The mantra never changes:  Have a thick skin.

Any leader will tell you that you cannot be too sensitive.  There are always critics.  No matter what your intentions, you will find that some people will respond negatively.  That’s just human nature.

But everyone reacts differently to criticism.  Believe me, I’ve had my share.  Some of it is mean or misguided, so I ignore it.  Some of it is hilarious, so I keep it to laugh.  And some of it is true and points out a weakness, so I keep it to learn.

Listening to the toughen-up directive always made me wonder.  It’s a common mantra, but what do you do with that advice?  Is there an emotional gym to strengthen our ability to ignore criticism?

Why the Little Things Matter

Why the Little Things Matter Photo

Photo courtesy of iStockphoto/ScottTalent

Not too long ago, a major power outage affected millions of people in Arizona, California and Mexico.  Two nuclear reactors were temporarily shut down.  Traffic backed up for miles all over the area.  Cars collided as frustrated drivers navigated without traffic signals.  Airports were shut down, stranding passengers.  Happening on an incredibly hot, triple-digit-temperature September day, the power outage knocked out much needed air conditioning.  It left people stuck in elevators.  Even the outdoors was affected.  San Diego beaches were closed when almost two million gallons of raw sewage spilled, a result of the water pumps failure at the regional station.  The failure continued to wreak havoc days after it was resolved.

Why did all of this happen?

What Was So Great About Catherine the Great?

Catherine the Great was by any definition a political success story.  Baptized Sophia Augusta Frederica, she rose from a young German girl to later take the name of Catherine II and become the most powerful woman in the world.  Moving to Russia at just fourteen years old, with no knowledge of the language and no hereditary claim to the throne, she later ascended to power in a coup.  The people of Russia loved her and she became one of the greatest benevolent despots ever known.

How she achieved such power is a fascinating study in leadership whether you agree with her methods or not.  Robert K. Massie now chronicles her extraordinary life in his new book, Catherine the Great.  Massie is a superlative author, historian and biographer.  He won the Pulitzer Prize for Peter the Great:  His Life and World.  His many books are loved for his ability to bring his characters to life.

What were some of the personal qualities serving Catherine’s goals?

Tom Perrotta Talks Leftovers (Not Last Night’s Meal)

Tom Perrotta has written seven novels: The Leftovers, The Abstinence Teacher, Little Children, Joe College, Election, The Wishbones, and Bad Haircut.  Both Little Children and Election were made into award-winning films.

Tom’s latest book, The Leftovers, has won numerous awards and mentions from almost every publication from Oprah’s O magazine to the New York Times.  The cover of the book was featured as one of the best book covers of 2011.